Lucretia Mott's Heresy: Abolition and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America

By Carol Faulkner | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
Pennsylvania Hall

On November 7, 1837, a mob murdered anti-slavery newspaper editor Elijah Lovejoy in Alton, Illinois. Lovejoy’s death shocked eastern abolitionists. They expected the violence—after all, mobs had already destroyed three of Lovejoy’s printing presses. But Lovejoy’s decision to use arms to defend his fourth press unsettled allies of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Lucretia and the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society expressed the views of most Garrisonians. While they blamed the system of slavery for the violence that destroyed both northern and southern homes, they deplored Lovejoy’s methods. Carnal weapons, the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society declared, “are not the proper means for advancement of our cause.”1

Two days after the news of Lovejoy’s murder arrived in Philadelphia, abolitionists celebrated the raising of Pennsylvania Hall. Both workmen and stockholders enjoyed a temperance and free produce feast at Ellis & Longstreth’s carpenter shop.2 Philadelphia’s abolitionists had built the hall at a cost of $40,000, or $926,000 today. The board of managers, led by President Daniel Neall, a Hicksite Quaker dentist, raised money by issuing two thousand shares at $20 apiece; the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society was among the stockholders.3 Abolitionists’ unity at this dinner disguised political differences that soon tore apart the American Anti-Slavery Society. As the Whig Party challenged former President Andrew Jackson’s Democrats for dominance, many abolitionists viewed party politics as a means to achieve anti-slavery goals. Abolitionists continued to struggle with the woman question. And, faced with mob violence, some abolitionists began to question the moral strategy of Garrisonians. Confronted

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lucretia Mott's Heresy: Abolition and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction- Heretic and Saint 1
  • Chapter 1- Nantucket 8
  • Chapter 2- Nine Partners 25
  • Chapter 3- Schism 41
  • Chapter 4- Immediate Abolition 60
  • Chapter 5- Pennsylvania Hall 75
  • Chapter 6- Abroad 87
  • Chapter 7- Crisis 109
  • Chapter 8- The Year 1848 127
  • Chapter 9- Conventions 148
  • Chapter 10- Fugitives 161
  • Chapter 11- Civil War 176
  • Chapter 12- Peace 197
  • Epilogue 213
  • Notes 219
  • Index 265
  • Acknowledgments 289
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 291

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.