Lucretia Mott's Heresy: Abolition and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America

By Carol Faulkner | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Abroad

THE WORLD’S ANTI-SLAVERY CONVENTION of 1840 transformed history, further dividing the abolitionist movement and connecting Lucretia with a young Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Yet Mott’s very public trip to London as the “leader of the delegate women from America” was shaped in part by private concerns over money problems and poor health.1 In September 1838, antislavery lecturer Charles C. Burleigh reported to his friend Miller McKim that the Penn Factory “was burned to the ground, & in it, part of the machinery, a considerable quantity of wool, & some manufactured goods.” James Mott owned one quarter of the business, and Burleigh estimated his losses at $20,000, about $500,000 today. James was despondent. The family (with Charles as a regular guest) feared that they might lose their home at 136 North Ninth Street, which would have forced them to move in with their daughter Anna, her husband Edward Hopper, and their baby, Lucretia. Now forty-five years old, Mott proudly described her first granddaughter, known as “Lue,” as “forward and smart.” In May 1838, Maria and Edward Davis also had their first child, Anna (Mott’s biographer Anna Davis Hallowell). Mott was moving into a new stage of life.

Though their two oldest daughters were established and secure in their own households, James and Lucretia still faced an uncertain financial future. The country had just emerged from the speculative crisis known as the Panic of 1837. Indeed, the economy would not fully recover from the resulting depression for another four years. James Mott owed money, Burleigh reported, and had no means to pay his debts since the fire. Nevertheless, Burleigh ended the letter on a positive note: “But I can hardly believe that he—known as he is

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Lucretia Mott's Heresy: Abolition and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction- Heretic and Saint 1
  • Chapter 1- Nantucket 8
  • Chapter 2- Nine Partners 25
  • Chapter 3- Schism 41
  • Chapter 4- Immediate Abolition 60
  • Chapter 5- Pennsylvania Hall 75
  • Chapter 6- Abroad 87
  • Chapter 7- Crisis 109
  • Chapter 8- The Year 1848 127
  • Chapter 9- Conventions 148
  • Chapter 10- Fugitives 161
  • Chapter 11- Civil War 176
  • Chapter 12- Peace 197
  • Epilogue 213
  • Notes 219
  • Index 265
  • Acknowledgments 289
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