Lucretia Mott's Heresy: Abolition and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America

By Carol Faulkner | Go to book overview

Epilogue

Lucretia Mott—or rather her public image—had a curious afterlife. She was eulogized and memorialized across the country. Her papers at the Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College contain almost two boxes of sympathy letters, newspaper clippings, and a volume full of obituaries. Paeans to her benevolence and goodness abounded. The Unitarian Review and Religious Magazine described her “essential womanliness” as well as her “indescribable mingling of saintliness and sense.” Her friend William Henry Furness adapted the beatitudes to remember her “long and saintly life”: “Blessed was her spirit, lowly, in self-forgetfulness, for hers was the kingdom of heaven.” He remembered that, “she dwelt in the world while she dwelt above it, diffusing happiness all around her.” Mary Grew wrote in the Philadelphia Ledger that “The name of Lucretia Mott is a synonym for a rare combination of Christian graces.” The Phrenological Journal and Science of Health paid tribute to her humanitarianism as well as her “unusually large head” and “high quality” brain.1

African Americans also mourned her loss. On November 14, 1880, the Rev. Henry Highland Garnet led a memorial service at his Shiloh Presbyterian Church in New York City. The ceremony was planned to coincide with similar events in Boston, Washington, and Baltimore. The New York Times reported that the audience “consisted mainly of well-to do colored people.” One activist noted that it was a fitting place to remember one “whose life work in behalf of human freedom had been spent so largely in aid of the colored race.”2 African Americans in the District of Columbia donated a floral arrangement in her honor to the National Woman Suffrage Association annual convention. In gratitude, Edward M. Davis delegated Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony to present a photograph of Mott to Howard

-213-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lucretia Mott's Heresy: Abolition and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction- Heretic and Saint 1
  • Chapter 1- Nantucket 8
  • Chapter 2- Nine Partners 25
  • Chapter 3- Schism 41
  • Chapter 4- Immediate Abolition 60
  • Chapter 5- Pennsylvania Hall 75
  • Chapter 6- Abroad 87
  • Chapter 7- Crisis 109
  • Chapter 8- The Year 1848 127
  • Chapter 9- Conventions 148
  • Chapter 10- Fugitives 161
  • Chapter 11- Civil War 176
  • Chapter 12- Peace 197
  • Epilogue 213
  • Notes 219
  • Index 265
  • Acknowledgments 289
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 291

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.