Lucretia Mott's Heresy: Abolition and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America

By Carol Faulkner | Go to book overview

NOTES

Introduction: Heretic and Saint
1. Daniel Kilbride, “Southern Medical Students in Philadelphia, 1800–1861: Science and Sociability in the ‘Republic of Medicine,’ ” Journal of Southern History 65, 4 (1999): 697–732.
2. “Sermon to the Medical Students,” in Dana Greene, ed., Lucretia Mott: Her Complete Speeches and Sermons (New York: Edwin Mellen, 1980), 82–83, 84, 88–89.
3. “Remarks, Delivered to the Anti-Sabbath Convention,” in Greene, 62; “Remarks, Delivered at the Twenty-Fourth Annual Meeting of the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society,” in Greene, 262.
4. Declaration of the Anti-Slavery Convention,” Liberator, Jan. 4, 1834.
5. Jean H. Baker, Sisters: The Lives of America’s Suffragists (New York: Hill and Wang, 2005), 6. Recent exceptions include Kathryn Kish Sklar, “ ‘Women Who Speak for an Entire Nation’: American and British Women at the World Anti-Slavery Convention, London, 1840,” in Jean Fagan Yellin and John C. Van Horne, eds., The Abolitionist Sisterhood: Women’s Political Culture in Antebellum America (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1994), 301–33; Nancy Isenberg, “ ‘ To Stand Out in Heresy’: Lucretia Mott, Liberty, and the Hysterical Woman,” Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 127, 1 (Jan. 2003): 7–23; Judith Wellman, The Road to Seneca Falls: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the First Woman’s Rights Convention (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2004); Sally G. McMillen, Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women’s Rights Movement (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008).
6. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage, History of Woman Suffrage (Rochester, N.Y.: Susan B. Anthony, 1887), 1: 420, 424.
7. Margaret Hope Bacon, Valiant Friend: The Life of Lucretia Mott (New York: Walker, 1980), cover, 6; Otelia Cromwell, Lucretia Mott: The Story of One of America’s Greatest Women (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1958). Other female activists have received significant scholarly attention, for example, Dorothy Sterling, Ahead of Her Time: Abby Kelley and the Politics of Anti-Slavery (New York: Norton, 1991); Carolyn L. Karcher, The First Woman in the Republic: A Cultural Biography of

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Lucretia Mott's Heresy: Abolition and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction- Heretic and Saint 1
  • Chapter 1- Nantucket 8
  • Chapter 2- Nine Partners 25
  • Chapter 3- Schism 41
  • Chapter 4- Immediate Abolition 60
  • Chapter 5- Pennsylvania Hall 75
  • Chapter 6- Abroad 87
  • Chapter 7- Crisis 109
  • Chapter 8- The Year 1848 127
  • Chapter 9- Conventions 148
  • Chapter 10- Fugitives 161
  • Chapter 11- Civil War 176
  • Chapter 12- Peace 197
  • Epilogue 213
  • Notes 219
  • Index 265
  • Acknowledgments 289
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