Lucretia Mott's Heresy: Abolition and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America

By Carol Faulkner | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The first spark for this book began in Kathryn Kish Sklar’s amazing course on American women’s history at Binghamton University, as Kitty discussed the career of Lucretia Mott and asked, “Can you believe there is no scholarly biography of Mott?” Beverly Wilson Palmer offered further inspiration and guidance when I worked as an editing fellow on The Selected Letters of Lucretia Coffin Mott. I am grateful to have such incredible mentors.

Since those early days, many people have offered assistance and encouragement. At SUNY Geneseo, President Chris Dahl, Provost Kate ConwayTurner, and Chair Jim Williams enabled a research leave at a crucial stage in this project. I am also grateful to Michael Oberg, who provided timely and essential assistance on the history of the Seneca Indians, and Emilye Crosby, who read the entire manuscript and came up with the title. When I moved to Syracuse University, my new colleagues Subho Basu, David Bennett, Susan Branson, Albrecht Diem, Michael Ebner, Paul Hagenloh, Samantha Herrick, Amy Kallander, George Kallander, Norman Kutcher, Chris Kyle, Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn, Dennis Romano, Roger Sharp, David Stam, Scott Strickland, Junko Takeda, and Margaret Susan Thompson welcomed me and this project. I owe special thanks to Dean Mitchel Wallerstein, Associate Dean Michael Wasylenko, and Craige Champion. I rely heavily on the excellent History Department staff: Patti Blincoe, Fran Bockus, and Patti Bohrer.

I appreciated the opportunity to research and write at some wonderful institutions. At Friends Historical Library, I benefited from a Margaret W. Moore and John M. Moore Research Fellowship. Curator Chris Densmore is a model historian and great ally. The FHL staff, including Barbara Addison,

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Lucretia Mott's Heresy: Abolition and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction- Heretic and Saint 1
  • Chapter 1- Nantucket 8
  • Chapter 2- Nine Partners 25
  • Chapter 3- Schism 41
  • Chapter 4- Immediate Abolition 60
  • Chapter 5- Pennsylvania Hall 75
  • Chapter 6- Abroad 87
  • Chapter 7- Crisis 109
  • Chapter 8- The Year 1848 127
  • Chapter 9- Conventions 148
  • Chapter 10- Fugitives 161
  • Chapter 11- Civil War 176
  • Chapter 12- Peace 197
  • Epilogue 213
  • Notes 219
  • Index 265
  • Acknowledgments 289
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