An Army of Lions: The Civil Rights Struggle before the NAACP

By Shawn Leigh Alexander | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
Aceldama and the Black Response

Th e Freedman is dying ’mid carnage and gore
God of our fathers!—hast thou given us o’er
In this bloody embrace, to these tigers a prey?
Let vengeance be thine!—thou wilt repay.
Away with the thought!—for this is no dream;
Th ey war against civil rights!—that is their theme.
But soon will they cringe, as we know full well
Th e crisis has come and the tolling bells tell
We will not yield, not in fear of the grave,
Th e rights that belong to the free and the brave.

—Henry McNeal Turner, 1881

Racial tensions in Danville, Virginia, a town of eight thousand with a slight black majority, were on the rise during the state election of 1883. Early in the campaign, several newspapers ran an editorial cartoon depicting white school children being paddled by an African American schoolmaster.1 The cartoon played on the fears of the white community, which had lost some political control to the African American community in the previous election. In 1882, blacks had gained both a majority in the city council and a healthy share of the law enforcement positions, and had begun to dominate the public market under an African American superintendent. Despite continued white control of key political positions—mayor, police chief, city sergeant, commissioner of revenue, etc.—the dominant rhetoric surrounding the election was that Danville’s “black government” must be defeated.2

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An Army of Lions: The Civil Rights Struggle before the NAACP
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter 1 - Aceldama and the Black Response 1
  • Chapter 2 - "Stand Their Ground on This Civil Rights Business" 23
  • Chapter 3 - Interregnum and Resurrection 66
  • Chapter 4 - Not Just "A Bubble in Soap Water" 98
  • Chapter 5 - To Awaken the Conscience of America 135
  • Chapter 6 - Invasion of the Tuskegee Machine 177
  • Chapter 7 - An Army of Mice or an Army of Lions? 220
  • Chapter 8 - "It Is Strike Now or Never" 262
  • Epilogue 297
  • Abbreviations 301
  • Notes 303
  • Index 375
  • Acknowledgments 380
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 382

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.