The Jazz Revolution: Twenties America & the Meaning of Jazz

By Kathy J. Ogren | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Like most jazz performances, this book is not a solo act. I have depended on contributions from others.

Most of my primary materials came from two outstanding jazz archives that contain valuable oral histories as well as other research materials. Curtis Jerde and the staff of the William Ransom Hogan Jazz Archive at Tulane University, New Orleans, helped me find oral histories and photographs. Dan Morgenstern and the staff of the Rutgers University Institute for Jazz Studies, Newark, likewise guided me through the riches of their collection. The Special Collections staff of the University of California Library, Los Angeles, provided useful information about West Coast entertainment, particularly in the George P. Johnson Negro Film Collection. Robert Brubaker and the Prints and Photographs staff at the Chicago Historical Society gave me useful pointers about jazz photographs. Summer research grants from the University of Redlands made possible my trips to the archives. The inter-Library Loan, Special Collections, and Periodicals staff of the Milton S. Eisenhower Library at The Johns Hopkins University, and the staff of the George Armacost Library at The University of Redlands also helped me track down sources.

The Jazz Revolution: Twenties America and the Meaning of Jazz began as my Ph.D. thesis. I received many helpful comments

-v-

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