Entertaining Satan: Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England

By John Putnam Demos | Go to book overview

8
“Hard Thoughts and Jealousies”

The story of witchcraft in early New England spotlights very sharply the power of local gossip. Behind the court proceedings—the formal “presentments,” the gathering of depositions, the trials themselves—one invariably finds a thick trail of talk. Of course, the ultimate source for all this lay in the minds and hearts of the people involved, but the oudet was words—for the most part, spoken words. The fear of supernatural evil sustained a vocabulary both rich and compelling.

This vocabulary was used in many different settings, some of them quite mundane and limited. Thomas Cooper, while arguing with Goodwife Phillips, called her “a blare-eyed witch.”1 Goodwife Holman was presented at court for making “opprobrious speeches” against Elizabeth Hooper; the speeches included such terms as “spiteful old witch” and “base old whore.”2 Mathew Farrington was charged with saying of Thomas Wheeler that “he was the Devil’s packhorse, to do the Devil’s drudgery.”3 Francis Urselton, in the midst of a lengthy quarrel, “railed on Goodwife Clark, saying she was a devilish woman, and the devil was in her and would have her.”4 Sarah Allen, presented for “keeping company” with her sweetheart on the Sabbath, “wished that the devil had die heart blood of all that spoke against it.”5 John Fosket came to blows with his neighbors, the Mousalls; to Goodwife Mousall he said “that she was a liar … and when she was going to the magistrate … the devil was at her left hand”—and to her husband “that all that he had was the devil’s, for he stood by his bedside and caused his members to rise.”6

-246-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Entertaining Satan: Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface to the Updated Edition vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Contents xvii
  • Introduction 3
  • One - Biography 17
  • 1 - "A Desolate Condition" 19
  • 2 - "Peace with No Man" 36
  • 3 - Witches- A Collective Portrait 57
  • Two - Psychology 95
  • 4 - "A Diabolical Distemper’ 97
  • 5 - "Let Me Do What I Could" 132
  • 6 - Accusers, Victims, Bystanders- The Innerlife Dimension 153
  • Three - Sociology 211
  • 7 - "The Mini of Our Town" 213
  • 8 - "Hard Thoughts and Jealousies" 246
  • 9 - Communities- The Social Matrix of Witchcraft 275
  • Four - History 313
  • 10 - "From Generation to Generation" 315
  • 11 - "Hearts against Hearts" 340
  • 12 - Communities- Witchcraft over Time 368
  • Appendix - List of Known Witchcraft Cases in Seventeenth-Century New England 401
  • Notes 411
  • Subject Index 533
  • Name Index 537
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 549

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.