CHAPTER XXIX

ONE of Anna’s objects in coming back to Russia had been to see her son. From the day she left Italy the thought of it had never ceased to agitate her. And as she got nearer to Petersburg, the delight and importance of this meeting grew ever greater in her imagination. She did not even put to herself the question how to arrange it. It seemed to her natural and simple to see her son when she should be in the same town with him. But on her arrival in Petersburg she was suddenly made distinctly aware of her present position in society, and she grasped the fact that to arrange this meeting was no easy matter.

She had now been two days in Petersburg. The thought of her son never left her for a single instant, but she had not yet seen him. To go straight to the house, where she might meet Alexey Alexandrovitch, that she felt she had no right to do. She might be refused admittance and insulted. To write and so enter into relations with her husband—that it made her miserable to think of doing; she could only be at peace when she did not think of her husband. To get a glimpse of her son out walking, finding out where and when he went out, was not enough for her; she had so looked forward to this meeting, she had so much she must say to him, she so longed to embrace him, to kiss him. Seryozha’s old nurse might be a help to her and show her what to do. But the nurse was not now living in Alexey Alexandrovitch’s house. In this uncertainty, and in efforts to find the nurse, two days had slipped by.

Hearing of the close intimacy between Alexey Alexandrovitch and Countess Lidia Ivanovna, Anna decided on the third day to write to her a letter, which cost her great pains, and in which she intentionally said that permission to see her son must depend on her husband’s generosity. She knew that if the letter were shown to her husband, he would keep up his character of magnanimity, and would not refuse her request.

The commissionaire who took the letter had brought her back the most cruel and unexpected answer, that there was no answer. She had never felt so humiliated as at the moment when, sending for the commissionaire, she heard from him the exact account of how he had waited, and how afterwards he had been told there was no answer. Anna felt humiliated,

-713-

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Anna Karenina
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Part I 1
  • Chapter II 4
  • Chapter III 8
  • Chapter IV 13
  • Chapter V 19
  • Chapter VI 29
  • Chapter VII 32
  • Chapter VIII 34
  • Chapter IX 37
  • Chapter X 45
  • Chapter XI 53
  • Chapter XII 58
  • Chapter XIII 63
  • Chapter XIV 65
  • Chapter XV 73
  • Chapter XVI 76
  • Chapter XVII 78
  • Chapter XVIII 82
  • Chapter XIX 88
  • Chapter XX 95
  • Chapter XXI 99
  • Chapter XXII 102
  • Chapter XXIII 107
  • Chapter XXIV 112
  • Chapter XXV 117
  • Chapter XXVI 123
  • Chapter XXVII 127
  • Chapter XXVIII 130
  • Chapter XXIX 133
  • Chapter XXX 137
  • Chapter XXXI 140
  • Chapter XXXII 144
  • Chapter XXXIII 147
  • Chapter XXXIV 151
  • Part II 156
  • Chapter II 160
  • Chapter III 165
  • Chapter IV 169
  • Chapter V 173
  • Chapter VI 177
  • Chapter VII 183
  • Chapter VIII 189
  • Chapter IX 194
  • Chapter X 198
  • Chapter XI 199
  • Chapter XII 201
  • Chapter XIII 205
  • Chapter XIV 213
  • Chapter XV 218
  • Chapter XVI 222
  • Chapter XVII 228
  • Chapter XVIII 233
  • Chapter XIX 235
  • Chapter XX 239
  • Chapter XXI 242
  • Chapter XXII 248
  • Chapter XXIII 254
  • Chapter XXIV 257
  • Chapter XXV 264
  • Chapter XXVI 270
  • Chapter XXVII 276
  • Chapter XXVIII 279
  • Chapter XXIX 283
  • Chapter XXX 288
  • Chapter XXXI 292
  • Chapter XXXII 295
  • Chaptjer XXXIII 301
  • Chapter XXXIV 306
  • Chapter XXXV 313
  • Part III 319
  • Chapter II 323
  • Chapter III 326
  • Chapter IV 333
  • Chapter V 339
  • Chapter VI 345
  • Chapter VII 349
  • Chapter VIII 354
  • Chapter IX 359
  • Chapter X 363
  • Chapter XI 367
  • Chapter XII 371
  • Chapter XIII 375
  • Chapter XIV 383
  • Chapter XV 388
  • Chapter XVI 393
  • Chapter XVII 397
  • Chapter XVIII 403
  • Chapter XIX 408
  • Chapter XX 411
  • Chapter XXI 415
  • Chapter XXII 422
  • Chapter XXIII 428
  • Chapter XXIV 433
  • Chapter XXV 437
  • Chapter XXVI 441
  • Chapter XXVII 446
  • Chapter XXVIII 453
  • Chapter XXIX 459
  • Chapter XXX 464
  • Chapter XXXI 468
  • Chapter XXXII 473
  • Part IV 477
  • Chapter II 480
  • Chapter III 482
  • Chapter IV 489
  • Chapter V 493
  • Chapter VI 499
  • Chapter VII 503
  • Chapter VIII 508
  • Chapter IX 513
  • Chapter X 521
  • Chapter XI 526
  • Chapter XII 528
  • Chapter XIII 533
  • Chapter XIV 537
  • Chapter XV 542
  • Chapter XVI 546
  • Chapter XVII 551
  • Chapter XVIII 559
  • Chapter XIX 564
  • Chapter XX 570
  • Chapter XXI 573
  • Chapter XXII 577
  • Chapter XXIII 583
  • Part V 587
  • Chapter II 594
  • Chapter III 600
  • Chapter IV 604
  • Chapter V 610
  • Chapter VI 613
  • Chapter VII 616
  • Chapter VIII 622
  • Chapter IX 625
  • Chapter X 629
  • Chapter XI 632
  • Chapter XII 638
  • Chapter XIII 640
  • Chapter XIV 643
  • Chapter XV 648
  • Chapter XVI 653
  • Chapter XVII 657
  • Chapter XVIII 662
  • Chapter XIX 666
  • Chapter XX 670
  • Chapter XXI 678
  • Chapter XXII 683
  • Chapter XXIII 688
  • Chapter XXIV 691
  • Chapter XXV 696
  • Chapter XXVI 700
  • Chapter XXVII 704
  • Chapter XXVIII 709
  • Chapter XXIX 713
  • Chapter XXX 719
  • Chapter XXXI 722
  • Chapter XXXII 727
  • Chapter XXXIII 730
  • Part VI 739
  • Chapter II 742
  • Chapter III 749
  • Chapter IV 753
  • Chapter V 756
  • Chapter VI 760
  • Chapter VII 765
  • Chapter VIII 771
  • Chapter IX 776
  • Chapter X 780
  • Chapter XI 786
  • Chapter XIII 799
  • Chapter XIV 801
  • Chapter XV 806
  • Chapter XVI 811
  • Chapter XVII 817
  • Chapter XVIII 822
  • Chapter XIX 827
  • Chapter XX 832
  • Chapter XXI 838
  • Chapter XXII 843
  • Chapter XXIII 851
  • Chapter XXIV 857
  • Chapter XXV 861
  • Chapter XXVI 865
  • Chapter XXVII 869
  • Chapter XXVIII 872
  • Chapter XXIX 877
  • Chapter XXX 882
  • Chapter XXXI 888
  • Chapter XXXII 892
  • Part VII 897
  • Chapter II 901
  • Chapter III 906
  • Chapter IV 911
  • Chapter V 915
  • Chapter VI 918
  • Chapter VII 920
  • Chapter VIII 924
  • Chapter IX 928
  • Chapter X 932
  • Chapter XI 937
  • Chapter XII 940
  • Chapter XIII 944
  • Chapter XIV 948
  • Chapter XV 954
  • Chapter XVI 958
  • Chapter XVII 961
  • Chapter XVIII 966
  • Chapter XIX 969
  • Chapter XX 973
  • Chapter XXI 978
  • Chapter XXII 984
  • Chapter XXIII 987
  • Chapter XXIV 991
  • Chapter XXV 996
  • Chapter XXVI 1002
  • Chapter XXVII 1006
  • Chapter XXVIII 1010
  • Chapter XXIX 1014
  • Chapter XXX 1017
  • Chapter XXXI 1021
  • Part VIII 1027
  • Chapter II 1031
  • Chapter III 1035
  • Chapter IV 1038
  • Chapter V 1041
  • Chapter VI 1043
  • Chapter VII 1046
  • Chapter VIII 1049
  • Chapter IX 1052
  • Chapter X 1054
  • Chapter XI 1057
  • Chapter XII 1061
  • Chapter XIII 1065
  • Chapter XIV 1068
  • Chapter XV 1073
  • Chapter XVI 1078
  • Chapter XVII 1082
  • Chapter XVIII 1084
  • Chapter XIX 1088
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