Madison Avenue and the Color Line: African Americans in the Advertising Industry

By Jason Chambers | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Although only a single name appears on the cover of this book, it would not have been possible without the support of a number of people and organizations.

First, my thanks to Robert Lockhart at the University of Pennsylvania Press for his support and guidance of this project over the years that it has taken to complete. Thanks also to my editor, Laura Helper-Ferris, whose skill, insight, and dedication were exemplary and of great help. I would also like to thank The Ohio State University and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign for financial support at various stages of this work’s development. Special thanks here to Bill Berry, who located additional research support for me at a crucial stage. Also many thanks to the Advertising Educational Foundation’s Visiting Professor Program for enabling me to spend two weeks at the Burrell Communications Group. Many thanks go out to the leaders and staff at Burrell for their insights into both current and historical issues facing the black consumer market and blacks in the advertising industry.

No historical project could ever be completed without the support of outstanding librarians and archivists, and it has been my pleasure to have encountered several such people: Audrey Davis, at the Alexandria Black History Resource Center, home of the Moss Kendrix papers; Ellen Gartrell and Jacqueline Reid at the John W. Hartman Center at Duke University; Fath Davis Ruffins and the staff at the National Museum of American History; the staff at the Chicago Historical Society, and Lisa Romero and the staff at the Communications Library at the University of Illinois. I would also like to thank the staff in the Department of Advertising office at the University of Illinois: Janette Bradley, Cinda Robbins-Cornstubble, and Robin Price, whose skill and dedication made the completion of this project easier.

I am grateful to several friends who have supported me with words of encouragement, advice, or simply offering me a place to stay. Special thanks to Carolyn Walker-Valentine and Gary Bess for allowing me to stay at their homes during research trips to Chicago and Washington, D.C., respectively, and to Leonard Moore, Sherwin Bryant, and Osei Appiah for their encouragement, advice, and wonderful examples of

-321-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Madison Avenue and the Color Line: African Americans in the Advertising Industry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Rise of Black Consumer Marketing 20
  • Chapter 2 - The Jackie Robinsons of Advertising and Selling 58
  • Chapter 3 - Civil Rights and the Advertising Industry 113
  • Chapter 4 - Affirmative Action and the Search for White Collars 157
  • Chapter 5 - The Golden Age 206
  • Epilogue 259
  • Notes 273
  • Index 307
  • Acknowledgments 321
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 322

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.