Sound Business: Newspapers, Radio, and the Politics of New Media

By Michael Stamm | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction. Underwriting the Ether:
Newspapers and the Origins of American Broadcasting

1. Reminiscences of William E. Scripps, May 1951, 6–7, RPP, CUOHROC.

2. Reminiscences of Thomas E. Clark, 24 May 1951, 4–5, 27–28, RPP, CUOHROC; Reminiscences of William E. Scripps, May 1951, 18, 20, RPP, CUOHROC; Arthur Pound, The Only Thing Worth Finding: The Life and Legacies of George Gough Booth (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1964), 227–29.

3. Reminiscences of William E. Scripps, May 1951, 22–24, RPP, CUOHROC.

4. Reminiscences of Thomas E. Clark, 24 May 1951, 29–32, RPP, CUOHROC; Reminiscences of William E. Scripps, May 1951, 23–25, RPP, CUOHROC; R. J. McLauchlin, “What the Detroit ‘News’ Has Done in Broadcasting,” Radio Broadcast 1 (June 1922): 136–37; Detroit News, 1 September 1920, quoted in Erik Barnouw, A Tower in Babel: A History of Broadcasting in the United States, vol. 1, To 1933 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1966), 63; Mitchell Charnley, News by Radio (New York: Macmillan, 1948), 1–4.

5. Alan Trachtenberg, The Incorporation of America: Culture and Society in the Gilded Age (New York: Hill and Wang, 1982), 3–4; Douglas Craig, Fireside Politics: Radio and Political Culture in the United States, 1920–1940 (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000); Robert Horwitz, The Irony of Regulatory Reform: The Deregulation of American Telecommunications (New York: Oxford University Press, 1989).

6. Between 1920 and 1955, the American population rose from 106.5 million to 165.3 million, a 55 percent increase, while daily newspaper circulation rose from 27.8 million to 56.1 million, a 102 percent increase. See U.S. Bureau of the Census, Historical Statistics of the United States, Colonial Times to 1970, Bicentennial Edition, 2 vols. (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1975), 9, 809; and Carl Kaestle and Janice Radway, “A Framework for the History of Publishing and Reading in the United States,

-199-

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