Sound Business: Newspapers, Radio, and the Politics of New Media

By Michael Stamm | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Neil Harris of the University of Chicago provided invaluable guidance and mentorship in the early development of this book. Advice, criticism, and support from George Chauncey, Amy Dru Stanley, and Adrian Johns influenced the book in countless ways, and I had the good fortune at Chicago of also working with Mae Ngai and Bill Novak.

At the University of Pennsylvania Press, my series editors Pamela Laird and Mark Rose have encouraged the project from its earliest stages of revision into book form and have been wonderful to work with. I owe a particular debt to Richard John, who invited me to give a talk at the Newberry Library several years ago, and who has remained an incisive critic and advocate since. Richard has read countless drafts of the manuscript, and his comments and suggestions have helped to shape the work into the book that it is today. My editor, Bob Lockhart, has provided unfailing good cheer and counsel throughout the writing process. Alison Anderson graciously shepherded the book through the production process.

Many others have generously offered indispensable assistance, advice, and criticism along the way: David Bailey, James Baughman, Sam Becker, Jane Briggs-Bunting, Michael Brillman, Michael Carriere, Frank Chorba, Mike Czaplicki, Hazel Dicken-Garcia, Lucinda Davenport, Kirsten Fermaglich, Lisa Fine, Kathy Roberts Forde, Douglas Gomery, Joanna Grisinger, Molly Hudgens, Bob Hunter, Mark Kornbluh, Steve Lacy, Grant Madsen, Ev Meade, Matt Millikan, John J. Pauly, Mark Pedelty, Chris Russill, Aaron Shapiro, Jim Sparrow, Christopher Sterling, Susan Strasser, David Suisman, Dwight L. Teeter, Jr., Al Tims, Derek Vaillant, and Ellen Wu. Erik Helin and Andrew Struska provided skilled research assistance.

All responsibility for errors of fact, omission, and interpretation is my own. Chapter drafts have been presented to audiences at Michigan State

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