A Legacy of Leadership: Governors and American History

By Clayton McClure Brooks | Go to book overview

Chapter Six
Preparing for the Presidency
The Political Education of Ronald Reagan

LOU CANNON

On November 18, 1980, two weeks after he was elected the fortieth president of the United States, Ronald Wilson Reagan sat down with Thomas P. (Tip) O’Neill, Speaker of the House of Representatives. The two men knew one another only by reputation, and O’Neill, whose Democrats held a commanding majority in the House, suspected that Reagan was in over his head. He told the president-elect that Sacramento, where Reagan had spent eight years as governor of California, was the “minor leagues.” Now they were in Washington, where O’Neill had been a member of the House since 1952. “This is the big leagues,” O’Neill said.1 Reagan’s aides were annoyed at the condescension. Reagan was amused. He understood that O’Neill was testing him and said later that it was advantageous to be underestimated by the Speaker of the House. Weeks later, as the new president’s economic programs advanced through the House with Democratic support, O’Neill lamented that he had underrated Reagan. Like others before and after him, the Speaker had failed to detect the formidable politician behind the Reagan smile or understand that eight contentious years in Sacramento had taught Reagan how to hit major-league pitching.

Since the middle of the twentieth century, California has been an eyecatching nation-state with a budget larger than all but a half-dozen countries in the world. For many, California epitomized the American dream, defined by William Faulkner as “sanctuary on earth for individual man.”2 California in the 1960s was also a cockpit of rebellion—in Berkeley, in Watts, and on the industrialized farms of the central valley where farm workers struggled to organize. State government was on the cutting edge of change. During Reagan’s governorship Sacramento was a laboratory for controversial policy decisions on abortion, air pollution, tax relief, and welfare reform. The state had a robust permanent govern-

-137-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Legacy of Leadership: Governors and American History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 289

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.