Let Us Fight as Free Men: Black Soldiers and Civil Rights

By Christine Knauer | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. Christine Knauer, “Grant Reynolds,” in African American National Biography, vol. 6, ed. Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007).

2. Quoted from Diagnosis of Grant Reynolds made by Anthony E. Coletta, Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Records, Library of Congress Manuscript Division, Washington, D.C. (hereafter NAACP Records), Part II, General Office File, 1940–1956, Box A 503, Folder 1943–1950.

3. See letter exchange between Truman K. Gibson and Walter White, NAACP Records.

4. Resignation Letter Reynolds to Walter White, September 28, 1944, NAACP Records.

5. In his later testimony, Reynolds underlined his unwillingness to leave the armed services: “I was put out of the Army because the Army said I had migraine headaches. Yes, I did have them and still have them but I begged to stay in the Army because my services were needed and my report will show it.” Universal Military Training: Hearings Before Senate Committee on Armed Services, 80th Cong. 2nd sess., 686 (March 31, 1948) (hereafter Senate Committee Hearings 1948).

6. Grant Reynolds, “What the Negro Soldier Thinks,” The Crisis, November 1944, 352–53, 357. Reynolds went so far as to compare the armed forces to the “plantation system.” “What the Negro Soldier Thinks About the War Department,” The Crisis, October 1944, 316–18, 328.

7. Reynolds, “What the Negro Soldier Thinks About This War,” The Crisis, September 1944, 291.

8. Reynolds, “What the Negro Soldier Thinks About the War Department.”

9. See, e.g., Jennifer E. Brooks, Defining the Peace: World War Veterans, Race, and the Remaking of Southern Political Tradition (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004), esp. 13–36.

-235-

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Let Us Fight as Free Men: Black Soldiers and Civil Rights
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Fighting for Respect 13
  • Chapter 2 - Coming Home 33
  • Chapter 3 - Stepping Up the Fight 55
  • Chapter 4 - Mass Civil Disobedience 82
  • Chapter 5 - Truman’s Order 112
  • Chapter 6 - A Country They Never Knew 130
  • Chapter 7 - Black Men at War 163
  • Chapter 8 - A Mixed Army 195
  • Epilogue 224
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms 231
  • Notes 235
  • Index 329
  • Acknowledgments 339
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