Let Us Fight as Free Men: Black Soldiers and Civil Rights

By Christine Knauer | Go to book overview

Index
21 Stayed, 215
24th Infantry Regiment, 174, 310n93, 311n108; and first victory of Korean War, 175–83 passim; memory of, 226–28; struggles and dissolution of, 195–99, 205, 209–10, 315n8, 319n56, 320n75. See also Leon Gilbert; Harold Martin; African American soldiers, depiction of
38th Parallel, The, 229
92nd Infantry Division: and Milton Bracker, 25–27, 29; contested image in World War II, 24–32, 311n108; and Gibson, 26–32
Adams, Clarence, 216
Adams, Julius, 31
air force, 51, 57, 74, 101, 132, 134, 166, 204, 206, 231
Africa, 34, 140, 190, 194, 215
Africans, 193, 252n16, 296n96
African American soldiers: depictions in Korean War, 163–66, 169, 171–83, 197–202, 204–11, 214–23, 225–30; depictions in World War II, 19–38, 40–50; join armed forces, 166–68; violence against, 3, 15, 19, 28, 32–33, 37, 38–43, 51, 128, 255n51, 313n151. See also 24th Infantry Regiment; 92nd Infantry Division; Leon Gilbert; Isaac Woodard
Afro-American. See Baltimore Afro-American
Almond, Edward M., 26–27, 31
American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), 125, 308n61
American Council on Human Rights (ACHR), 191
American Legion, 43, 58, 260n4
American Revolution, 107
American Veterans Committee (AVC), 43, 125
American Veterans of Foreign Wars, 58
Americanism, 14, 40, 59, 86, 96, 165
American Dilemma, An, 21, 245n52
anti-Communism, 80, 190, 307n58
Appleman, Roy, 226, 314n6
armed forces, 1, 2, 4, 6, 10–15, 18, 19, 21, 22, 24–26, 28, 31, 32, 27, 38, 43, 44, 46–48, 52–54, 56–57, 59, 60, 64, 66, 71–73, 75, 79–81, 84, 86, 88–90, 93, 94, 96–101, 105, 106, 108, 112, 113, 115–17, 119–22, 124, 125, 129, 131–32, 144, 156, 161, 164, 166, 170, 171, 180, 182, 184, 198, 199, 202, 203, 206, 210, 219, 220, 223–25, 231, 232, 243, 235n6, 245n52, 253n22, 262n21, 270n134, 275n57, 279n101, 287, 304n32, 305n34, 319n6
armed services. See armed forces
armistice, 213
army, 1–4, 8, 9, 11, 19, 22, 24–26, 29, 30, 31, 35, 39, 43–45, 48, 51, 55–57, 60, 62, 64, 67, 69, 70, 72, 74, 76, 86, 94, 100, 101, 105, 106, 108, 113, 114, 122, 124, 129, 131, 134, 138, 139, 144, 153, 154, 159, 160, 162, 166, 167, 169, 175, 195, 197, 198–207, 209–11, 213, 215, 217, 219, 221, 223, 226, 231, 241n47, 268n97, 271n9, 276n66, 283n17, 294n63, 305n33, 320n75
Army Service Club, 154
Army War College, 43
Asia, 49, 129, 133, 134, 153, 171, 213–15; America and, 137–45 passim, 177, 190, 194, 20
Associated Negro Press (ANP), 17, 21, 26, 30, 86, 140, 147, 245n55, 247n78, 296n89. See also Claude Barnett

-329-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Let Us Fight as Free Men: Black Soldiers and Civil Rights
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Fighting for Respect 13
  • Chapter 2 - Coming Home 33
  • Chapter 3 - Stepping Up the Fight 55
  • Chapter 4 - Mass Civil Disobedience 82
  • Chapter 5 - Truman’s Order 112
  • Chapter 6 - A Country They Never Knew 130
  • Chapter 7 - Black Men at War 163
  • Chapter 8 - A Mixed Army 195
  • Epilogue 224
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms 231
  • Notes 235
  • Index 329
  • Acknowledgments 339
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 341

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.