Slavery's Borderland: Freedom and Bondage along the Ohio River

By Matthew Salafia | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book is the product of many years of reflection and guidance, making it impossible to truly list everyone who contributed to the final project. These acknowledgments, then, much like the book itself, cannot be truly comprehensive. I have been the beneficiary of supportive scholars, colleagues, friends, and family, and for that I consider myself lucky.

Robert Lockhart at the University of Pennsylvania Press has helped with the sometimes mysterious process of transforming my manuscript into a book. My readers provided thoughtful and challenging critiques to the manuscript. In particular I want to thank Andrew Cayton for his reminder to take my own advice and “listen to the river.”

Before it was a book, this project began as my attempt to write a researchable article. Several colleagues convinced me that I had, in fact, stumbled onto something much more significant. When working through the project, Thomas Slaughter significantly shaped and improved each chapter with his straightforward and insightful comments. His quiet guidance helped make me the scholar I am today. I am only now realizing just how much wisdom he passed on to me. Jon Coleman had a way of asking ostensibly simple questions that challenged my assumptions and improved my arguments. Linda Przybyszewski and Richard Pierce challenged me to realize and articulate the significance of the project. David Waldstreicher provided trenchant and illuminating criticisms that made this a far better project. He has generously provided comments at all stages, including the final polishing revisions. David’s unflagging support has helped me develop from a diffident researcher to a confident scholar.

Without the help of archivists and staff members at various institutions I could never have found so much wonderful material. When I first started the project, Thomas Hamm at Earlham College helpfully pulled several items I had no idea were even in the collections. At the Indiana Historical Society, Wilma Moore pointed me in the direction of numerous articles and gems from the archives. The staffs of the Indiana State Library, the Cincinnati Historical Society, and the Ohio Historical Society skillfully

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