THE NEGRO

CHAPTER I
AFRICA

“Behold!
The Sphinx is Africa. The bond
Of Silence is upon her. Old
And white with tombs, and rent and shorn;
With raiment wet with tears and torn,
And trampled on, yet all untamed.”

MILLER

AFRICA is at once the most romantic and the most tragic of continents. Its very names reveal its mystery and wide-reaching influence. It is the “Ethiopia” of the Greek, the “Kush” and “Punt” of the Egyptian, and the Arabian “Land of the Blacks.” To modern Europe it is the “Dark Continent” and “Land of Contrasts”; in literature it is the seat of the Sphinx and the lotus eaters, the home of the dwarfs, gnomes, and pixies, and the refuge of the gods; in commerce it is the slave mart and the source of ivory, ebony, rubber, gold, and diamonds. What other continent can rival in interest this Ancient of Days?

There are those, nevertheless, who would write universal history and leave out Africa. But how, asks Ratzel, can one leave out the land of Egypt

-9-

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The Negro
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vi
  • Contents vii
  • The Negro 9
  • Chapter II - The Coming of Black Men 20
  • Chapter III - Ethiopia and Egypt 30
  • Chapter IV - The Niger and Islam 47
  • Chapter V - Guinea and Congo 62
  • Chapter VI - The Great Lakes and Zymbabwe 79
  • Chapter VII - The War of Races at Land’s End 91
  • Chapter VIII - African Culture 103
  • Chapter IX - The Trade in Men 143
  • Chapter X - The West Indies and Latin America 160
  • Chapter XI - The Negro in the United States 183
  • Chapter XII - The Negro Problems 232
  • Afterword 245
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 273
  • Index 283
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