Violence and Belief in Late Antiquity: Militant Devotion in Christianity and Islam

By Thomas Sizgorich | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION

1. ʿAmmār al-Baṣrī, Kitāb al-burhān, ed. Mishal Hayek, inʿAmmār al-Baṣrī: Apologie et controversies (Beirut, 1977), 32–33. This critique appears, for example, in the seventhcentury Doctrina Jacobi Nuper Baptizati, 5.16.11, ed. and French trans. Vincent Déroche, Travaux et Mémoirés 11 (1991): 209: Here a former Jew recalls that when he asked an elderly and learned Jew about the prophet who had appeared among the Saracens, the old man replied, “He is a false [prophet]. For do prophets come with a sword and war chariot?”

2. See the edition of this pamphlet, with French translation, of Dominique Sourdel, “Un pamphlet Musulman anonyme d’époque ‘Abbāside contre les Chrétiens,” Revue des études islamiques 34 (1966): 1–33, here 33.

3. See H. A. Drake, Constantine and the Bishops: The Politics of Intolerance (Baltimore, 2000), 429–31, 249–50. See also P. S. Davies, “The Origin and Purpose of the Persecution of A.D. 303,” JTS 40 (1981): 66–94, esp. 84–85.

4. See most recently Michael Gaddis, There Is No Crime for Those Who Have Christ: Religious Violence in the Christian Roman Empire (Berkeley, 2005).

5. “The Apology of Timothy the Patriarch before the Caliph Mahdi,” Syriac text ed. and trans. A. Mingana, Woodbrooke Studies 2 (1928): 1–162, here, 61–62. See also the Arabic version, ed. Hans Putman, L’Église et L’Islam sous Timothée I (780–823) (Beirut, 1986), 32–33 (#162–68).

6. “The Apology of Timothy,” ed. and trans. Mingana, 62.

7. Ambrose, De obitu Theodosii 4, ed. and trans. Mary Dolorosa Mannix, Sancti Ambrosii Oratio de Obitu Theodosii(Washington, D.C., 1925), 47.

8. R. Malcolm Errington, “Christian Accounts of the Religious Legislation of Theodosius I,” Klio 79 (1997): 398–443; R. Malcolm Errington, “Church and State in the First Years of Theodosius I,” Chiron 29 (1998): 21–72; Drake, Constantine and the Bishops, 441ff.; Peter Brown, Power and Persuasion in Late Antiquity: Towards a Christian Empire (Madison, 1992), 109.

9. See Gaddis, No Crime; Drake, Constantine and the Bishops, 409–11; Brown, Power

-285-

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