Violence and Belief in Late Antiquity: Militant Devotion in Christianity and Islam

By Thomas Sizgorich | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I am fortunate enough to owe thanks to a great many friends, colleagues, and teachers. First among these are Hal Drake, R. Stephen Humphreys, James Brooks, Elizabeth Digeser, Clifford Ando, Michael Maas, Chase Robinson, Sharon Farmer, Nancy McLoughlin, John Lee, Cam Cocks, Dorothy Abrahamse, Conrad Barrett, Douglas Domingo-Forasté, David Hood, Karl Squitier, Timothy C. Graham, Jay Rubenstein, Justine Andrews, Charlie Steen, Tim Moy, Andrew Sandoval-Strausz, Cathleen Cahill, Liz Hutchison, Kym Gauderman, Sam Truett, and Patricia Risso, all of whom by their kindness, patience, and expertise have aided me immeasurably through the initial stages of my career, and contributed crucially to the evolution of this book. During the writing of this book itself, I benefited profoundly and ceaselessly from the wisdom, generosity, and love of Michael Proulx, David Torres-Rouff, Christina Torres-Rouff, Justin Stephens, Eric Fournier, Jonathan Sciarcon, Heidi Marx-Wolf, Monica Orozco, Tryntje Helfferich, Rachael Sizgorich, Cecily MacCaffrey, and Kathy Drake. I am also grateful for the generosity, encouragement, and advice of Suleiman Mourad, Nadia Maria El Cheikh, Ra’anan Boustan, Nimrod Hurvitz, Fred Donner, Cam Grey, Raymond Van Dam, Brent Shaw, Arietta Papaconstantinou, and Christopher Melchert. I am deeply indebted to the School of Advanced Research in Santa Fe, New Mexico, the Department of History at the University of New Mexico, the Department of History at Oregon State University in Corvallis, the Gorham Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and Claudia Rapp and the University of California Multi-Campus Research Group for their generous support and hospitality. I am grateful also for the permission granted by Johns Hopkins University Press and Cambridge University Press to reprint portions of articles that appeared initially in the Journal of Early Christian Studies and Past & Present. I also thank Edgar Kent Press and the

-397-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Violence and Belief in Late Antiquity: Militant Devotion in Christianity and Islam
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 398

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.