Voices of the English Reformation: A Sourcebook

By John N. King | Go to book overview

2.3. Hugh Latimer, from
The Sermon on the Plowers (1548)

Hugh Latimer (c. 1485–1555) was the spiritual leader of the first generation of English Protestants. Having risen from humble birth to become bishop of Worcester, he resigned from office when his evangelical style of episcopal practice conflicted with Henry Vlll’s reaffirmation of Catholic theology and church polity during the late 1530s. He was imprisoned in the Tower of London in 1546 at a time when Queen Catherine Parr, whom he served as spiritual adviser, and her associates fell under suspicion during the Anne Askew affair (see 6.1, 7.5.C). Restored to favor during the reign of Edward VI, he became an influential royal counselor and court preacher (see Figure 3). Latimer’s Sermon on the Plowers exemplifies the colloquial plainness, alliterative language, and anecdotal style for which his preaching gained renown. He delivered it in the Shrouds (a crypt) at Saint Paul’s Cathedral in London in 1548 because rainfall interrupted delivery at Paul’s Cross, an outdoor pulpit. Interpreting the Parable of the Sower (Luke 8) as an allegory concerning a humble preaching ministry dedicated to Bible instruction, Latimer identifies the husbandman with religious reform and the redress of social and political corruption in a long tradition associated with Piers Plowman, Tyndale’s plowboy (see 6.5.A), and religious satires including Spenser’s May Eclogue. John Day and William Seres printed a popular edition of this sermon under the auspices of Latimer’s patroness, the Duchess of Suffolk.

SOURCE: STC 15291, A2r–A6r, B3r–B4r, C2v–C4v.

EDITION: Selected Sermons of Hugh Latimer, ed. Allan Chester (Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia for the Folger Shakespeare Library, 1968).

REFERENCES: Chester; King 1982.

All things which are written are written for our erudition and knowledge. All things that are written in God’s book, in the Bible book, in the book of the Holy Scripture, are written to be our doctrine.1

I told you in my first sermon, honorable audience, that I purposed to declare unto you two things. The one, what seed should be sown in God’s field, in God’s plowland. And the other, who should be the sowers. That is to say, what doctrine is to be taught in Christ’s church and congregation, and what men should be the teachers and preachers of it. The first part I have told you in the three sermons past, in which I have assayed to set forth my plow, to prove what I could do.

And now I shall tell you who be the plowers, for God’s word is a seed to be sown in God’s field, that is, the faithful congregation, and the preacher is the sower. And it is in the Gospel: Exivit qui seminat seminare semen suum, “He that soweth, the husbandman, the plowman went forth to sow his seed”2 so that a preacher is resembled to a plowman, as it is in another place:

-68-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Voices of the English Reformation: A Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 394

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.