Inventing the Egghead: The Battle over Brainpower in American Culture

By Aaron Lecklider | Go to book overview

4
“The Negro Genius”: Black Intellectual Workers
in the Harlem Renaissance

Without the New Knowledge the New Negro is no better than the
old. And this new knowledge will be found in the books.

—Hubert Harrison

In 1937, Benjamin Brawley, dean of Morehouse College, published an assessment of the recent literary movement known as the Harlem Renaissance. His book, The Negro Genius, attempted to account for the explosion of black literary and artistic accomplishment during the 1920s and into the 1930s. As he surveyed this vibrant cultural movement, spearheaded by black writers, artists, and performers, Brawley detected a particular form of intelligence—a rising black intellectualism—among African American culture workers, a feature that Brawley attributed to his title phenomenon. “Every race has its peculiar genius,” Brawley declared in his introduction. “As far as we can at present judge, the Negro, with all his manual labor, is destined to reach his greatest heights in the field of the artistic.”1 For Brawley, the accomplishments of African Americans in the performing and literary arts derived from black culture’s unique claim to artistic genius and offset associations of blackness with physicality Though his analysis occasionally rehashed a familiar ideology of racial uplift whereby culturally accomplished African Americans were upheld as paragons of racial progress and others were expected to adhere to similar aspirations, Brawley departed from Booker T. Washington and other self-improvement advocates

-92-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Inventing the Egghead: The Battle over Brainpower in American Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 285

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.