Tragic Years, 1860-1865: A Documentary History of the American Civil War - Vol. 2

By Paul M. Angle; Earl Schenck Mlers | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 27
“THE YEAR OF THE PROCLAMATION”

AFTER CHICKAMAUGA, Rosecrans fortified Chattanooga. Bragg saw an opportunity for the kind of bloodless conquest that was his concept of war. Chattanooga lies on the south side of the tortuous Tennessee River, which at this point flows from west to east. East of the city, five miles away at the closest point, Missionary Ridge extends north and south. An equal distance to the southwest lies Lookout Mountain with its northernmost shoulder touching the Tennessee. The one railroad coming in from the north—the Nashville and Chattanooga— ran so close to Lookout Mountain that, like the Tennessee River, it could be controlled by a force on the mountain. Bragg distributed his troops on Missionary Ridge, on Lookout and in the Chattanooga Valley between the two elevations, closed off the Federal communications, and waited for starvation to force his opponent to surrender.

Rosecrans, strangely bereft of the dash he had formerly shown, seemed to see as the alternative to this fate a retreat toward Nashville. Washington refused to consider the possibility. Rosecrans was relieved, and Thomas was put in command of the Army of the Cumberland. Sherman with the Army of the Tennessee was ordered to Chattanooga; Hooker brought two corps from the Army of the Potomac; and Grant was given supreme command.

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Tragic Years, 1860-1865: A Documentary History of the American Civil War - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • 1863 - Continued ix
  • Chapter 23 - Mississippi High Jinks- Vicksburg 563
  • Chapter 24 - Seesaw- Vicksbrg and Gettysburg 599
  • Chapter 25 - Fateful July 633
  • Chapter 26 - The Rock of Chickamauga 669
  • Chapter 27 - "The Year of the Proclamation" 703
  • Chapter 28 - The Depths of Suffering 722
  • 1864 751
  • Chapter 29 - "A Hideous Failure" 753
  • Chapter 30 - "Cries Arose of Grant!" 780
  • Chapter 31 - "Bold Offensive" 813
  • Chapter 32 - From Cherbourg Harbor to Peach Tree Creek 839
  • Chapter 33 - "War Is War" 868
  • Chapter 34 - The Best of Freedom 898
  • Chapter 35 - While All Georgia Howled 924
  • Chapter 36 - A Gift for Mr. Lincoln 949
  • 1865 971
  • Chapter 37 - A King’s Cure for All Evils 973
  • Chapter 38 - The Hard Hand of War 991
  • Chapter 39 - "An Affectionate Farewell" 1012
  • Chapter 40 - "Where I Left Off" 1043
  • Notes 1052
  • Index 1067
  • About the Authors 1098
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