Tragic Years, 1860-1865: A Documentary History of the American Civil War - Vol. 2

By Paul M. Angle; Earl Schenck Mlers | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 38
THE HARD HAND
OF WAR

ANOTHER SPRING APPROACHED—the fourth since those early days in 1861 when elderly gentlemen in Charleston enlisted as Home Guardsmen and practiced military evolutions so that they would he ready for the Negro insurrection certain to follow Mr. Lincoln’s inauguration. Judge Campbell, who had accompanied Stephens to the Peace Conference at Hampton Roads, had said that spring of 1861: “Who can give self-control to Southern members [of Congress] or prevent them from showing that slavery is ordained by Heaven?” The Union armies had undertaken to give an answer in a war that now squeezed the Confederacy into an ever-diminishing stockade.


I

Ending that war quickly, effectively, had become the burning passionwith Sherman, certainly, who had no intention of lolling at ease in Savannah, or sending his army north in transports as Grant proposed. On December 24, less than two days after entering Savannah, Sherman began sketching for Grant the outline of new bold ventures:1

… I feel no doubt whatever as to our future plans. I have thought them over so long and well that they appear as clear as daylight. I left Augusta untouched on purpose, because the enemy will be in doubt as to my objective point, after we cross the Savannah River, whether it be Augusta or Charleston, and will naturally divide his forces. I will then

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Tragic Years, 1860-1865: A Documentary History of the American Civil War - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • 1863 - Continued ix
  • Chapter 23 - Mississippi High Jinks- Vicksburg 563
  • Chapter 24 - Seesaw- Vicksbrg and Gettysburg 599
  • Chapter 25 - Fateful July 633
  • Chapter 26 - The Rock of Chickamauga 669
  • Chapter 27 - "The Year of the Proclamation" 703
  • Chapter 28 - The Depths of Suffering 722
  • 1864 751
  • Chapter 29 - "A Hideous Failure" 753
  • Chapter 30 - "Cries Arose of Grant!" 780
  • Chapter 31 - "Bold Offensive" 813
  • Chapter 32 - From Cherbourg Harbor to Peach Tree Creek 839
  • Chapter 33 - "War Is War" 868
  • Chapter 34 - The Best of Freedom 898
  • Chapter 35 - While All Georgia Howled 924
  • Chapter 36 - A Gift for Mr. Lincoln 949
  • 1865 971
  • Chapter 37 - A King’s Cure for All Evils 973
  • Chapter 38 - The Hard Hand of War 991
  • Chapter 39 - "An Affectionate Farewell" 1012
  • Chapter 40 - "Where I Left Off" 1043
  • Notes 1052
  • Index 1067
  • About the Authors 1098
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