The Métis of Senegal: Urban Life and Politics in French West Africa

By Hilary Jones | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This study would not have been possible without the generosity of many people and agencies. My initial research for this project came about with the assistance of a Social Science Research Council International PreDissertation Award. A Fulbright-Hays fellowship allowed me to carry out field research in Senegal and France. The Dubois-Rodney-Mandela postdoctoral fellowship from the Center of Afro-American Studies at the University of Michigan afforded me the space for me to begin to conceptualize the book. A Graduate Research Board summer award from the University of Maryland facilitated research in the Library of Congress and financial support from Macalester College permitted me to conduct additional research at the Spiritains archives in France. I am grateful for the support of people at these institutions as well as the intellectual communities that shaped my thinking and encouraged the development of this study. I owe a debt to the Africana Studies program and the History Department at the University of Notre Dame as well as colleagues at Macalester College and the University of Maryland, College Park.

I benefited enormously from Senegalese teranaga or hospitality. Many people welcomed me, responded enthusiastically to my project, and patiently helped me to navigate unfamiliar terrain. The staff of the National Archives, especially directors Saliou Mbaye and Boubacar Ndiaye as well as Mamadou Ndiaye, assisted me by asking the right questions of the archival collections and affording me access to key documents. At University Cheikh Anta Diop, historians Penda Mbow, Ibrahima Thioub, and Boubacar Barry provided valuable guidance. I also benefited from conversations with Charles Becker, Fatou Sow, Pathe Diagne, Fadel Dia, and Souylemane Bachir Diagne. I am indebted to Wilma Randle, Marie Florence Diokh,

-ix-

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