The Métis of Senegal: Urban Life and Politics in French West Africa

By Hilary Jones | Go to book overview

INDEX
Page numbers for illustrations are in italic.
A. Teisseire (Bordeaux firm), 151
adultery, 84, 86, 219n35
Africa: as antithesis of civil society, 119– 20, 227n3; colonialism as negotiation process, 6; mixed race identity under colonialism, 10; patterns of consumerism, 89, 221n49; republican institutions originating in, 186. See also French West Africa.
agricultural colonization, failure of, 42– 43. See also peanut cultivation and trade.
Aidra, Abdoul Hadir, 11
Alain, Desirée, 20, 203n2
Alain, Jean-Jacques (L’Antillais), 20, 203n2
Alain, Louis, 203n2
Alin family history, 189, 203n2
Alliance Française, 96, 109
Alsace, George, 47
Alsace, Louis, 47, 54
Aly, Jean, 104
Amin, Samir, 198n11
Amselle, Jean Loup, 4
ancien régime: colonialism in, 25–26; extramarital sexual relations in, 219n35; symbols of aristocratic power, 90
Anderson, Benedict, 227n2
Angrand, Léopold, 142, 154, 160, 233n9
Angrand family history, 189–90
Ankersmit, H. J., 243n70
Anne, Hamat Ndiaye (tamsir), 135
apprentices, slave children as, 60
arbre du conseil, 36
Arguin (island, Mauritania), 141, 150, 159–60, 210n11
arts d’agrément (music and dance), 99
assimilation: abandonment as colonial policy in 20th century, 156–57; as colonization objective, 123; denying rights to originaires as departure from, 174; Muslim rejection of, 75, 117; republican institutions as extension of, 140
assimilés, schools reserved for, 176
association of barristers, 112–14, 226n41
associations: Alliance Française, 96, 109; cercles, 109; Jeunes Sénégalais, 109, 168; Masonic lodges, 110–11 (see also Freemasons); métis habitants and Europeans dominating, 109–10; Mothers of Families, 110, 118–19; stabilizing democratic institutions, 109, 225n29; urban life and, 108–14; as venue for debates, 110
Atlantic Creoles, 4, 5, 198n7
Aurora of Saint Louis, 175, 241n57
Auslander, Leora, 221n50
Aussenac, Rosalie, 209n1
Austen, Ralph, 209n3
Bancal, Prosper, 220n42
Bank of Senegal, 131–32, 166, 231n38

-259-

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