Oil Wealth and Insurgency in Nigeria

By Omolade Adunbi | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book is the product of extensive research and several years of collaboration and dialogue with many individuals and groups to whom I owe a debt of gratitude. It would not have been possible without the generous funding I received from numerous institutions. I thank the Coca Cola World Fund at Yale, the Yale Program in Agrarian Studies, the Yale Center for International and Area Studies, the Orville Schell Human Rights Fellowship at Yale Law School, and the Lindsay Fellowship for Research in Africa for providing initial support during the early development of this book. I am also grateful to the Yale McMillan Center for Dissertation Research, which funded my extensive fieldwork in Nigeria, to the Department of Anthropology, and for the dissertation fellowship that enabled me to begin putting all these ideas into book form. Support from the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies at the University of Michigan helped fund follow-up research between 2011 and 2013—research that helped clarify many of the stories told in this book. A manuscript workshop at the University of Michigan in the fall of 2012 was instrumental in helping me reshape and clarify its final arguments. I am particularly grateful to Andrew Apter, Adam Ashforth, Kelly Askew, and Michael Watts, who not only provided tremendous feedback at the workshop but also read many subsequent drafts of the manuscript. I thank my colleagues at the University of Michigan for their critical engagement: Kwasi Ampene, Fernando Arennas, Adam Ashforth, Bilal Butt, Robin Means Coleman, Doris David, Angella Dillard, Frieda Ekotto, Kevin Gaines, Sandra Gunning, Nesha Haniff, Rebecca Hardin, Paul C. Johnson, Martha S. Jones, Mike McGovern, Tiya Miles, Martin Murray, Adedamola Osinulu, Joyojeet Pal, Damani Patridge, Anne Pitcher, Amal Fadllalal, Sherie Randolph, Xiomara Santamarina, Ray Silverman, Howard Stein, Megan Sweeney, and Stephen Ward. I am particularly grateful to my mentors, Kelly Askew and Derek Peterson, for their guidance, intellectual inspiration, and methodological advice. I thank Elisha Renne for her support and mentorship. I thank the staff of the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, particularly Faye Portis and Wayne High, who helped organize the manuscript workshop where the initial draft of this book was discussed. I would also like

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