Health and Economic Outcomes in the Alumni of the Wounded Warrior Project, 2010-2012

By Heather Krull; Mustafa Oguz | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
Introduction and Background

This document describes analysis performed by the RAND Corporation for the Wounded Warrior Project (WWP). WWP is a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to honor and empower wounded warriors by raising awareness about the needs of injured service members, helping them assist one another, and providing programs that nurture the mind and body and encourage economic empowerment and engagement.

WWP is engaged in a longitudinal data-collection effort involving five waves of a survey aimed at understanding the deployment experiences, employment status, financial circumstances, physical and emotional health, and health care needs of its alumni.1 RAND researchers developed the survey instrument in an earlier effort. Westat administered the 2010, 2011, and 2012 surveys and prepared reports describing the results of each.2 Table 1.1 describes the number of eligible survey participants, completed surveys, and response rate for each year. WWP also tracked the alumni who responded to multiple surveys: 499 in the 2010 and 2011 surveys; 1,567 in 2011 and 2012; and 389 in all three years.

WWP asked RAND to do a more in-depth analysis of the survey data, focusing on identifiable subsets of the respondents across which outcomes may vary, including among individuals who have responded to multiple waves of the survey, and, where possible, on how WWP alumnus outcomes compare with those of other injured and ill populations. This report documents those results.

Table 1.1
Survey Dates and Response Rates, 2010–2012

1 Wounded warriors who join WWP are called alumni. WWP alumni are military personnel who incurred serviceconnected injuries on or after September 11, 2001. Alumni self-select into the project and, at the time of registration, are required to provide a copy of their DD 214 (Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty), their U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) award letter, line-of-duty (LOD) documentation, or current unit orders (if on active duty) to allow WWP to determine their eligibility for project and program membership. Alumnus participation in any of the programs or services offered by WWP is voluntary.

2 The 2010, 2011, and 2012 Westat reports are Franklin, Hintze, Hornbostel, Lee, et al. (2010); Franklin, Hintze, Noftsinger, et al. (2011); and Franklin, Hintze, Hornbostel, Smith, et al. (2012).

-1-

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Health and Economic Outcomes in the Alumni of the Wounded Warrior Project, 2010-2012
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vii
  • Summary ix
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Abbreviations xix
  • Chapter One - Introduction and Background 1
  • Chapter Two - Survey Methodology 5
  • Chapter Three - Analysis and Results 7
  • Chapter Four - Comparisons with Related Studies 81
  • Chapter Five - Conclusions and Discussion 85
  • Appendix - Alternative Specifications of Wounded Warrior Project Goals 87
  • References 99
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