Southern Water, Southern Power: How the Politics of Cheap Energy and Water Scarcity Shaped a Region

By Christopher J. Manganiello | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3
New Deal Big Dam Consensus

The Savannah River valley’s residents were accustomed to the river running dry or high in the twentieth century. Augusta’s factory managers had sent workers home for weeks after shutting down waterpowered operations along the Augusta Canal during previous droughts. And the 1908 flood alone had done enough damage to convince the city government to investigate, finance, and construct an eleven-mile levee to keep the Savannah River’s almost annual flood surges out of the city.1 Given these past weather events, the prolonged, heavy, and cold rains of September 1929 surely looked threatening to residents of Augusta, Georgia, and Hamburg, South Carolina, who had lived through previous bouts of water anxiety and insecurity.

The Savannah River valley’s weather swung hard in the direction of rain after the New South’s 1925 drought of record. Over the course of thirty-six hours beginning September 26, 1929, nearly nine inches of rain fell across the upper Savannah River valley’s landscape. Countless dry gullies, numerous small creeks, and broad rivers swelled beyond capacity and sent a forty-six-foot flood crest down the Savannah River’s main channel. The surge breeched the Augusta levee a few miles below the central business district. Water flowed from the river through the levee and into the city and proceeded to back up the city’s stormwater drains and flood homes and businesses. The first flood wave passed, and the rain briefly abated. Then, on October 1 and 2, a second storm—this time the tropical remnants of a Category One Gulf of Mexico hurricane—moved across the southeast from Apalachicola Bay in the Florida panhandle to Augusta and dropped another eight inches of rain on an already saturated landscape. Unable to absorb any more water, the land shed the deluge, and the Savannah River rose again to send a second, larger flood crest downstream to the Augusta metro area. The Great Flood of 1929 plowed through the Piedmont, easily surged over the low Stevens Creek and Augusta Canal

-69-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Southern Water, Southern Power: How the Politics of Cheap Energy and Water Scarcity Shaped a Region
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 306

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.