National Dreams: The Remaking of Fairy Tales in Nineteenth-Century England

By Jennifer Schacker | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter i

1. Edgar Taylor, “German Popular and Traditionary Literature,” New Monthly Magazine and Literary Journal 2 (1821): 146.

2. Charlotte Yonge uses the term “class literature” extensively in her three-part series, “Children’s Literature of the Last Century”; see, e.g., Macmillan’s Magazine 20 (1869): 229.

3. Peter Burke, “The ‘Discovery’ of Popular Culture,” in Raphael Samuel, ed., People’s History and Socialist Theory (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1981), 216.

4. The Grimms stand as forefathers of modern, field-based folklore study. For example, see Linda Dégh, “Folk Narrative,” in Richard M. Dorson, ed., Folklore and Folklife: An Introduction, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1972), 54; Dan Ben-Amos, “Folktale,” in Richard Bauman, ed., Folklore, Cultural Performances, and Popular Entertainments: A Communications-Centered Handbook (New York: Oxford University Press, 1992), 106; Robert A. Georges and Michael Owen Jones, Folkloristics: An Introduction (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1995), 37–38. This convention was firmly in place by 1858, when Dasent penned his introductory essay for Popular Tales from the Norse.

5. The legacy of the Grimms has recently been explored by a number of folklorists. See Roger D. Abrahams, “Phantoms of Romantic Nationalism in Folkloristics,” Journal of American Folklore 106 (1993): 3–37; Regina Bendix, “Diverging Paths in the Scientific Search for Authenticity,” Journal of Folklore Research 29, no. 2 (1992): 103–32, and In Search of Authenticity: The Formation of Folklore Studies (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1997); and Charles Briggs, “Metadiscursive Practices and Scholarly Authority in Folkloristics,” Journal of American Folklore 106 (1993): 387–434.

6. Collections inspired by the Grimms’ example include Asbjørnsen and Moe’s Norske Folkeeventyr (1842), translated by George Webbe Dasent as Popular Tales from the Norse (discussed in chapter 5); Sutermeister’s Kinder- und Hausmärchen aus der Schweiz (1869); and Afanasév’s Narodnye Russkie Skaski (1855–63). In his 1946 study, The Folktale, Stith Thompson provides an appendix, “Principal Collections of Folktales,” organized by nation. It is remarkable how many of the key European collections were made concurrently, in the mid- to late nineteenth century. See Thompson’s Folktale (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1977), 467–79.

7. Jacqueline Simpson and Steve Roud, introduction to A Dictionary of English Folklore (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000), i. E. J. Hobsbawm cites the

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
National Dreams: The Remaking of Fairy Tales in Nineteenth-Century England
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 198

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.