Gilding the Market: Luxury and Fashion in Fourteenth-Century Italy

By Susan Mosher Stuard | Go to book overview
Illustrations
Altichiero da Zavio and Jacopo Avanzi, Adoration of the Magi, c. 1379 frontispiece
Plates
Following page 136 1. Reliquary for the foot of St. Blaise, probably eleventh century 2. School of Giotto, St. Francis Renounces All World Possessions, 1298 3. Giotto di Bondone, Ognissanti Madonna, c. 1305 4. Giotto di Bondone, Expulsion of Joachim from the Temple, c. 1305 5. Guariento di Arpo, detail from Angelic Orders, c. 1350 6. Master of the Urbino Coronation, The Annunciation to Zacharias, 1350–1400 7. Center medallion of a twelve-medallion necklace, fourteenth century 8. School of Giovanni da Milano, La famiglio del conte Stefano Porro, fresco, 1370, Oratoria di S. Stefano, Lentate sul Seveso 9. Nicolo` da Bologna, Madonna and Child Enthroned between Saints Petronius and Alle (Eligius), Christ in the Initial A, after 1383 10. Master of the Madonna of Mercy, St. Eligius Working a Gold Saddle for King Clothar, late fourteenth century 11. Master of the Madonna of Mercy, panel detail from Commission from King Clothar to St. Eligius, late fourteenth century 12. Crucifixion, England, c. 1395 13. Wisdom Personified, miniature, cutting from a Bible Historiale by Guiart de Moulins, Paris, c. 1400 14. Lippo di Vani, Priest, leaf from a gradual, Siena, mid-1340s
Figures
1. Treatise on the Seven Vices, Genoa, 1350–1400 6 2. Cleveland silver gilt belt, Siena, fourteenth century 50 3. Altichiero da Zavio, Council of King Ramiro 58 4. Portrait of a youth, detail, fresco in San Giovanni in Conca 68

-vii-

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Gilding the Market: Luxury and Fashion in Fourteenth-Century Italy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Desirable Wares 20
  • Chapter 3 - Gravitas and Consumption 56
  • Chapter 4 - Curbing Women’s Excesses 84
  • Chapter 5 - Costs of Luxuries 122
  • Chapter 6 - Shops and Trades 154
  • Chapter 7 - Marketmakers 190
  • Chapter 8 - Conclusion 228
  • Notes 241
  • Bibliography 293
  • Index 321
  • Acknowledgments 331
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