Gilding the Market: Luxury and Fashion in Fourteenth-Century Italy

By Susan Mosher Stuard | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1
1. In jewelry production gold ducats could be pounded into gold leaf for gilding. See Chapter 5.
2. On measures, see Bruno Kisch, Scales and Weights: A Historical Culture (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1965), 150–55, and Ronald Edward Zupko, Italian Weights and Measures from the Middle Ages to the Nineteenth Century (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 1981), 81–83. For bullion in the Mediterranean region, one exagia= 24 carats (0.9 grams); 1 carat = 4 grains (0.0475 grams).
3. Edwin S. Hunt and James M. Murray, A History of Business in Medieval Europe, 1200–1550 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), 169.
4. Giovanni Villani, Chroniche de Giovanni, Matteo e Filippo Villani, ed. A. Racheli (Trieste: Austriaca, 1857), vol. 1, bk. 12, chap. 92, and Peter Spufford, Profits and Power: The Merchant in Medieval Europe (London: Thames and Hudson, 2002), 65–67.
5. It is difficult to estimate Venetian wealth before the 1420s, when Venice amassed a land empire in Italy. Spufford argues that “by the 1420s it [Venice] was possibly the richest capital in Europe” (Profits and Power, 66).
6. Catherine Kovesi Killerby, Sumptuary Law in Italy, 1200–1500 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002), 26–40. See also Curzio Mazzi, “Alcune leggi suntuarie senesi,” Archivio storico italiano, 4th ser., 5 (1880): 133–44. Siena was unusual in forbidding some ornaments to men as well as women as early as the thirteenth century.
7. Luciana Frangioni, Chiedere e ottenere: L’approvvigionamento di prodotti di successo della bottega Datini di Avignone nel XIV secolo (Florence: Opus Libri, 2002), 41–42. Florence produced wares “alla senese,” swords in the style of Siena, and “alla guisa di Bordello,” in the style of Bordeaux, and weaponry in the styles of Hungary and Milan.
8. Killerby, Sumptuary Law in Italy, 28.
9. For comparison of Genoese and Venetian trade in the fourteenth century, see Benjamin Z. Kedar, Merchants in Crisis (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1976). Kedar frequently employs Genoese commenda agreements preserved in the city’s colonies.
10. William N. Bonds, “Genoese Noblewomen and Gold Thread Manufacturing,” Medievalia et Humanistica, old ser. 17 (1966): 79–81. Unfortunately Bonds specified no names of Genoese noblewomen who manufactured gold thread.
11. See Luigi Tommaso Belgrano, Vita privata dei Genovesi (Rome: Multigrafica Editrice, 1970), 194–288, for discussion of Genoese wardrobes in medieval times.
12. Giovanni Boccaccio, The Decameron, trans. Frances Winwar (New York: Modern Library, 1955), The First Day, Eighth Story, pp. 31–33. See discussion in Steven

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Gilding the Market: Luxury and Fashion in Fourteenth-Century Italy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Desirable Wares 20
  • Chapter 3 - Gravitas and Consumption 56
  • Chapter 4 - Curbing Women’s Excesses 84
  • Chapter 5 - Costs of Luxuries 122
  • Chapter 6 - Shops and Trades 154
  • Chapter 7 - Marketmakers 190
  • Chapter 8 - Conclusion 228
  • Notes 241
  • Bibliography 293
  • Index 321
  • Acknowledgments 331
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