Traitors: Suspicion, Intimacy, and the Ethics of State-Building

By Tobias Kelly; Sharika Thiranagama | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
Xiconhoca: Mozambique’s Ubiquitous
Post-Independence Traitor

Lars Buur

A nation can survive its fools, even the ambitious ones. But it cannot survive
treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known
and carries his banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the
gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very
halls of government itself. For the traitor appears not a traitor; he speaks in
accents familiar to his victims, and he wears their face and their arguments; he
appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men. He rots the soul
of a nation; he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars
of the city; he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist. A murderer
is less to fear. The traitor is the plague.

—Marcus Tullius Cicero, The Enemy Within, 45 B.C.E.

There exist many Xiconhocas infiltrated in the midst of us.

—Tempo 303, 1976, 2

In 2005, a few months after Mozambican president Armando Guebuza had been elected, I met “João” in Mavago, in Niassa Province.1 Visibly nervous and unsettled, João was on his way back to Maputo after spending more than twenty years in Mavago. In 1983, he had been forcibly rounded up during Operation Production for not having all the required identity papers or official confirmation of employment. Within twenty-four hours, he had been sent to a work camp outside Mavago—in the direction of the Tanzanian border, close to Msiwise and Base Central, where the Liberation Front of Mozambique’s (Frelimo, from its Portuguese title Frente de Libertação de Moçambique) first “liberated zones” were established in the 1960s—without any subsequent contact with his family in Maputo. He had survived the sixteen years of internal

-24-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Traitors: Suspicion, Intimacy, and the Ethics of State-Building
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 273

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.