Urban Green: Nature, Recreation, and the Working Class in Industrial Chicago

By Colin Fisher | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

From outward appearance, historians cut solitary figures. We spend countless hours deep in the archives studying evidence left by the dead. When we reemerge, we spend even more time sitting alone at our desks quietly organizing data, writing, editing, and rewriting. Unlike our more collaborative colleagues in other fields, the vast majority of historians embrace the single-author model, so in the end, it is almost always one name that appears on the dust jacket. But all of this obscures the fact that good history is always the product of a rich social context. All socalled single-author books are in fact coproduced and coauthored by dozens and dozens of people behind the scenes. This book is no different.

I incurred debts even before I wrote the first word of Urban Green. This book would have been impossible without the aid of a number of excellent teachers, first at Lawrence University and then later at the University of California–Irvine. In particular, I want to acknowledge Dickson Bruce, Karen Carr, Paul Cohen, Nina Dayton, Frank Doeringer, Alice Fahs, Bob Moeller, Ken Pomerantz, Mark Poster, Dave Rankin, Anne Schutte, Amy Dru Stanley, Sally Stein, Tanis Thorne, Steven Topik, and Jon Wiener. As is often the case, I learned just as much from my fellow graduate students as I did from my formal classes. In particular, I would like to thank Jem Axelrod, Stan Beyer, Ian Carter, Pete Catapano, Rob Cerniglia, Brian Crawford, Mary Joyce, Kyle Julien, Doug Sackman, Raj Sampath, and Jennifer Steenshorne.

From inception to conclusion, colleagues generously listened to my sometimes-inchoate ideas, read drafts, offered constructive criticism, pointed me in new directions, and shared tips on using Chicago’s rich archival resources. In particular, I want to thank: Peter Alter, Peter Baldwin, Scott Bucking, Mike Davis, Sarah Elkind, Karen Flint, Dianne Glave, David Hoyt, Bob Johnson, Matthew Klingle, Patricia Limerick, Kathryn Morse, Donald Mrozek, Dominic Pacyga, Tracy Poe, James Ralph, Mart Stewart, Margaret Storey, Jeffrey Stine, Mark Stoll, Terence Young, and Louis Warren. In addition, I would like to thank two student research assistants: Mychal Odom and Keith Albrandt.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Urban Green: Nature, Recreation, and the Working Class in Industrial Chicago
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.