A Teacher's Guide to Working with Paraeducators and Other Classroom Aides

By Jill Morgan; Betty Y. Ashbaker | Go to book overview

4
Monitoring the
Quality of Your
Paraeducator’s Work
Whether they call it evaluating, assessing, checking, or just “keeping an eye on things,” monitoring classroom activities and behavior is something all teachers do. In fact, more effective teachers do it more often than less effective teachers. In classrooms that are well managed, teacher-managers constantly monitor what is going on so that they can take preventive measures and have fewer problems and disruptions. In this chapter we address these questions:
Why is student behavior and progress monitored, and is paraeducators’ work monitored for the same reasons?
How can you establish monitoring your paraeducator as a positive and supportive procedure designed to assist her in her work?
How can you teach your paraeducator to monitor her own work?

The Reasons for Monitoring

Why is student behavior and progress monitored, and is paraeducators’ work monitored for the same reasons? Some teachers and paraeducators who are assigned to the same classroom tell us that they do not watch each other—as if they fear that there may be an implied criticism in admitting that they observe someone else’s work. We find it hard to believe that this can be so, but think for a moment about why you monitor your students’ work and behavior. Write down some of the things that you monitor in your classroom, and why you monitor those things.

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A Teacher's Guide to Working with Paraeducators and Other Classroom Aides
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Introduction v
  • 1 - Leading the Classroom Instructional Team 1
  • 2 - Assigning Roles and Responsibilities 12
  • 3 - Improving Communications 23
  • 4 - Monitoring the Quality of Your Paraeducator’s Work 41
  • 5 - Providing on-the-Job Training 50
  • 6 - Creating a Feedback Loop 67
  • 7 - The Logistics 76
  • 8 - Troubleshooting 84
  • 9 - Practicing What You’Ve Learned 88
  • References and Resources 97
  • Index 99
  • About the Authors 102
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