Beyond Guns and Steel: A War Termination Strategy

By Dominic J. Caraccilo | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
The Bad

War involves a train of unforeseen and unsupported circumstances that no
human wisdom could calculate to end.

—Thomas Paine, British pamphleteer, revolutionary,
radical, inventor, and intellectual

So what happens when things don’t go as planned or go wrong because of a lack of planning? Regardless of the dynamics of conflict brought on by the likes of an insurgency or other campaign-changing events, an exit strategy is highly desirable because lacking it could result in reduced confidence in leadership, a drop in troop morale, possibility of increased casualties, and may negate any success achieved by the actual intervention which, in turn, may negate public opinion and support.1 But these detriments hit only on the operational effects; strategically, the cost could be cataclysmic.As seen in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), the slow transition to a manageable conflict resolution strategy may result in the onset of an insurgency because the environment became vulnerable to insurgent activity. Examples of failures or conflicts we can learn from include the Korean War, 1956 Suez Crisis, Vietnam, Somalia, Bosnia, the Global War on Terror, and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF).
KOREA … THE NEVER-ENDING (TERMINATING) WAR
Numerous theories have been put forward, even in this book, to explain why a state decides to terminate a war. This portion of the book will examine the following four theories as they relate to the Korean Conflict; a conflict that by my estimate was an example as a failure in war termination and conflict resolution:
1. Winners and Losers: This theory states that a war ends when one state wins and the other state is defeated. The theory predicts that when a state’s forces

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Beyond Guns and Steel: A War Termination Strategy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Fog of Postwar 21
  • Chapter 2 - War Termination Strategy Goes Webster 57
  • Chapter 3 - The Good 82
  • Chapter 4 - The Bad 106
  • Chapter 5 - The Missing Link- The Interagency Struggle 130
  • Chapter 6 - The Nesting of Goals and Objectives to Achieve an End 145
  • Chapter 7 - The Art of Ending War 150
  • Epilogue 161
  • Appendix - Agreement on Ending the War and Restoring Peace in Viet-Nam 165
  • Notes 177
  • Bibliography 197
  • Index 211
  • About the Author 221
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