Beyond Guns and Steel: A War Termination Strategy

By Dominic J. Caraccilo | Go to book overview

Epilogue

Si vis pacem, para bellum.

                        —Latin adage for “Ifiyou wish for peace, prepare for war”


BEYOND THE GUNS AND STEEL

Although critics will argue this is a scientific approach to bringing termination to a fight and a conflict to resolution, I emphasize that this is merely a tool or a set of tools to help strategists and planners as well as leaders to convey a methodical and visual way of developing a complete plan. My goal is to give the reader options to look at combat operations holistically and not just revert to the focus of gun fighting and closing with and destroying the enemy. It is clear that conflict is more than just ridding a foe of a capability; it has a postconflict requirement starting with war termination and leading into conflict resolution resulting in a desired endstate. In short, without proper planning our endstate will have an apogee of hope and a perigee of despair.

Although the Armed Forces have proven themselves a capable policy instrument, the nation has always struggled with conflict termination. The United States has often prevailed militarily while failing to achieve policy goals quickly and efficiently. A scan of joint publications suggests that military professionals embrace the idea of a termination strategy, but doctrine offers little practical help. It is time to take the next step: creating an interagency organization and practices that can effectively conduct termination planning.1

History, as I hope this work has shown, is replete with examples of the good, bad, and indifferent when it comes to viewing conflict as a life cycle process. Time progresses; the Middle East, although not at peace, is stable as Iraq is transitioned to a host-nation run security force, government, and society. The United States, the major fighting force in the effort to win the

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Beyond Guns and Steel: A War Termination Strategy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Fog of Postwar 21
  • Chapter 2 - War Termination Strategy Goes Webster 57
  • Chapter 3 - The Good 82
  • Chapter 4 - The Bad 106
  • Chapter 5 - The Missing Link- The Interagency Struggle 130
  • Chapter 6 - The Nesting of Goals and Objectives to Achieve an End 145
  • Chapter 7 - The Art of Ending War 150
  • Epilogue 161
  • Appendix - Agreement on Ending the War and Restoring Peace in Viet-Nam 165
  • Notes 177
  • Bibliography 197
  • Index 211
  • About the Author 221
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