Military Doctrine: A Reference Handbook

By Bert Chapman | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Indexes and Scholarly Journals

An essential component of any area of scholarly research is articles published in scholarly journals. This is true for military doctrine as well as for other subjects. Performing effective scholarly research on any subject involves thoroughly searching for individual journal article citations on this subject, and this is best accomplished by searching print indexes or electronic databases rather than perusing bookshelves for articles. Some indexes are freely available on the Internet and their Web site URLs are listed below. Other indexes are produced by commercial companies and may be available in selected academic and public libraries. An example of a freely available periodical index is the Air University Library Index to Military Periodicals, produced by Air University Library at Maxwell Air Force Base in Alabama. This long-standing military science literature index covers 1988– present and is freely accessible at http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS3260.

This index features detailed citations and links to subject headings for additional research. Upon retrieving citations from this and other databases, users will need to check their local libraries to see if they have paper or electronic copies of the articles cited in these resources.

America: History and Life, produced by ABC-CLIO, indexes articles, book chapters, books, and dissertations on American and Canadian history from 1450 to the present. It will be available in many academic libraries and general information on it is available at http://www.abc-clio.com/.

EBSCO’s Military and Government Collections is another resource produced by a prominent libraries serial vendor. It provides full-text access to articles from nearly three hundred journals and periodicals, along with numerous pamphlet resources with retrospective coverage that dates back to the mid–1980s. General information on this is accessible at http://www.ebsco.com/.

ABC-CLIO also produces the database Historical Abstracts, which indexes articles, book chapters, books, and dissertations on national and international

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