Climate Change in the Midwest: Impacts, Risks, Vulnerability, and Adaptation

By S. C. Pryor | Go to book overview

17.
Climate Change Impacts, Risks,
Vulnerability, and Adaptation in the
Midwestern United States: What Next?

S. C. PRYOR AND R. J. BARTHELMIE


the Context

A recent study attempted to measure the priorities placed by Americans across a range of “problems” confronting society. When respondents were asked “What do you think will be the most serious problem facing the world in the future if nothing is done to stop it?” 25 percent replied with either “global warming” or “the environment” (Yeager et al. 2011). Variants in the wording of the questions greatly influenced the responses, but nevertheless this study suggests that the general public views anthropogenic forcing of climate as a serious problem. This finding is emphasized by another cross-sectional survey in the United States that found that “of 771 individuals survey, 81% (n = 622) acknowledged that climate change was occur ring, and were aware of the associated ecologic and human health risks” (Semenza et al. 2011).

The widespread acknowledgement of anthropogenic forcing of climate—as well as the rapidity with which some aspects of the climate system are changing—means it is imperative that effective climate policy be developed and implemented. Effective responses to climate change will likely incorporate components of both mitigation and adaptation, though interestingly, there has been a marked shift in the relative importance of policy activities in these arenas over the last two decades (see the example provided in Figure 17.1) as recognition of the inevitability of climate change and the presence of an “adaptation gap” (see chapter 1) has grown.

In this volume we have identified and quantified key vulnerabilities to climate variability and change within the Midwest and provided robust projections of relevant climate parameters to assess future risk. We present analyses to address the regional-scale human-environmental system components and interactions in the Midwest in response to climate change and related stressors. Using the schematic framework shown in Figure 17.2, this volume documents the regional indicators of possible climate change vulnerability and the climate change scenarios for the region and thus provides a basis for considering adaptation actions. The research summarized is thus intended as a tool for

-230-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Climate Change in the Midwest: Impacts, Risks, Vulnerability, and Adaptation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 266

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.