General Jacob Devers: World War II's Forgotten Four Star

By John A. Adams | Go to book overview

Prologue

WHEN APPOINTED CHIEF OF STAFF IN 1939, GEORGE C. Marshall faced a seemingly impossible task. Out of a small, second-rate peacetime army, he had to create what became an 8-million-man machine tasked with beating both the horror of Nazi Germany and the Japanese scourge of the Pacific. One of the first people to whom he turned is little remembered today. Out of a bag of good ideas, Jacob Devers created the Armored Force of sixteen armored divisions and a host of separate battalions that led to the retaking of Europe. As one of two American army group commanders under Dwight Eisenhower (the other was Omar Bradley), Devers led the invasion of southern France, commanding most of the French Army as well as the U.S. Seventh Army as they rampaged across southern Germany and into Austria.

While he worked for Eisenhower, the two did not get along well. Marshall had his hands full keeping both his star protégé and one of his first picks for general highly motivated and productive. Here is the story of Devers and his rise to four stars.

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General Jacob Devers: World War II's Forgotten Four Star
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Maps ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Prologue 3
  • One - Early Years 5
  • Two - The Interwar Years 21
  • Three - Marshall Recognizes Devers 35
  • Four - Chief of Armored Force 52
  • Five - The Debate over Doctrine 72
  • Six - Commander, Eto 94
  • Seven - Deputy Supreme Commander, Mto 118
  • Eight - The French and a Southern Front 140
  • Nine - Dragooned 157
  • Ten - Up the Rhône Valley 176
  • Eleven - An End to Champagne 193
  • Twelve - Into the Cold Vosges 216
  • Thirteen - Cross the Rhine? 233
  • Fourteen - Throw Down at Vittel and Its Aftermath 261
  • Fifteen - Nordwind Strikes Devers 290
  • Sixteen - The Colmar Pocket Finally Collapses 315
  • Seventeen - Undertone to Austria 334
  • Eighteen - Postwar 372
  • Epilogue 390
  • Notes 395
  • Bibliography 419
  • Index 425
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