Mexico Is Not Colombia: Alternative Historical Analogies for Responding to the Challenge of Violent Drug-Trafficking Organizations - Vol. 2

By Christopher Paul; Colin P. Clarke et al. | Go to book overview

Summary

Drug-related violence has become a very serious problem in Mexico. Violent drug-trafficking organizations (VDTOs) produce, transship, and deliver tens of billions of dollars’ worth of narcotics into the United States annually. The activities of VDTOs are not confined to drug trafficking; they extend to numerous other criminal enterprises, including human trafficking, weapon trafficking, kidnapping, money laundering, extortion, bribery, and racketeering. Then, there is the violence: Recent incidents have included assassinations of politicians and judges; attacks on rival organizations, associated civilians (i.e., the families of members of competing groups or of government officials), and the police and other security forces; and seemingly random violence against innocent bystanders.

The full scope and details of the threat posed by VDTOs are not well understood, and optimal strategies to combat these organizations have not been identified. Furthermore, the associated security challenges are not confined to Mexico. Many are rooted in (or have spilled over into) neighboring countries, including the United States. Scholars often compare these security challenges with those faced by Colombia, but there are vocal critics of this approach. As indicated by the title of this report, we agree that Mexico is not Colombia. While certain characteristics of the Colombian case do provide useful lessons for Mexico, the historical record shows that security challenges (and their resolutions) from other times and places are also germane to contemporary Mexico and should not be overlooked. To more thoroughly and accurately examine the current security situation in Mexico, it is important

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Mexico Is Not Colombia: Alternative Historical Analogies for Responding to the Challenge of Violent Drug-Trafficking Organizations - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Figure and Tables xiii
  • Summary xv
  • Acknowledgments xxix
  • Abbreviations xxxi
  • Chapter One - Colombia (1994–2010) 1
  • Chapter Two - Peru (1980–1992) 23
  • Chapter Three - The Balkans (1991–2010) 53
  • Chapter Four - West Africa (1990–2010) 85
  • Chapter Five - The Caucasus (1990–2012) 119
  • Chapter Six - Somalia (1991–2010) 151
  • Chapter Seven - Angola (1992–2010) 167
  • Chapter Eight - Burma (1988–2012) 183
  • Chapter Nine - Tajikistan (1992–2008) 197
  • Chapter Ten - Afghanistan (2001–2013) 211
  • References 223
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