Mexico Is Not Colombia: Alternative Historical Analogies for Responding to the Challenge of Violent Drug-Trafficking Organizations - Vol. 2

By Christopher Paul; Colin P. Clarke et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
Peru (1980–1992)

Case Selection Categories: Resource Insurgency, Ungoverned Spaces, High Level of Organized Crime

The Peruvian government was engaged in a large and notoriously bloody COIN campaign from 1980 until the early 1990s—one that did not officially end until the 1992 arrest and incarceration of Abimael Guzmán, the leader of Peru’s largest and most violent insurgent group, Sendero Luminoso, or Shining Path. Although Peru’s internal unrest did not entirely terminate with Guzmán’s arrest, it calmed appreciably as many Sendero insurgents either faded away or formed smaller splinter groups with far less capability and decidedly less revolutionary zeal. While remnants of Sendero still exist today (led by Comrade Artemio) and the organization continues to “carry out small scale attacks against police often in response to coca eradication and other anti-narcotics operations,”1 it has been reduced to a mostly fringe criminal organization that dabbles in occasional acts of terrorism.2

The Peruvian conflict is notable for a number of reasons, the first two of which are reflected in the Mexico case most acutely. First, it resulted in nearly 70,000 deaths,3 mostly among unarmed civilian

1 Thomas Mockaitis, Resolving Insurgencies, Carlisle, Pa.: Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, 2011, p. 43.

2 See Kathryn Gregory, Shining Path, Tupac Amaru (Peru, Leftists), New York: Council on Foreign Relations, August 27, 2009.

3 Frank Hyland, “Peru’s Sendero Luminoso: From Maoism to Narco-Terrorism,” Terrorism Monitor, Vol. 6, No. 23, December 8, 2008, p. 1.

-23-

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Mexico Is Not Colombia: Alternative Historical Analogies for Responding to the Challenge of Violent Drug-Trafficking Organizations - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Figure and Tables xiii
  • Summary xv
  • Acknowledgments xxix
  • Abbreviations xxxi
  • Chapter One - Colombia (1994–2010) 1
  • Chapter Two - Peru (1980–1992) 23
  • Chapter Three - The Balkans (1991–2010) 53
  • Chapter Four - West Africa (1990–2010) 85
  • Chapter Five - The Caucasus (1990–2012) 119
  • Chapter Six - Somalia (1991–2010) 151
  • Chapter Seven - Angola (1992–2010) 167
  • Chapter Eight - Burma (1988–2012) 183
  • Chapter Nine - Tajikistan (1992–2008) 197
  • Chapter Ten - Afghanistan (2001–2013) 211
  • References 223
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