Mexico Is Not Colombia: Alternative Historical Analogies for Responding to the Challenge of Violent Drug-Trafficking Organizations - Vol. 2

By Christopher Paul; Colin P. Clarke et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN
Angola (1992–2010)

Case Selection Categories: Warlordism, Resource Insurgency, Ungoverned Spaces

The conflict in Angola began with the war of independence against the Portuguese (1961–1974) and then morphed into a battle for control of the state—and its vast resources—among three competing armed groups: the People’s Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA), the National Liberation Front of Angola, and the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA).1 The first phase of the conflict, from 1975 to 1992, was a classic Cold War–era proxy conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union.2 Following the end of the Cold War, the MPLA and UNITA were forced to fund their respective organizations through what Michael Ross has called “booty futures,” or the sale of the rights to precious commodities.3 This case study focuses exclusively on the period from 1992 to 2010, detailing the struggle for power and control over the means to fight for that power.

1 Fernando Andresen Guimarãse, The Origins of the Angolan Civil War: Foreign Intervention and Domestic Political Conflict, Basingstoke, UK: Macmillan, 1998.

2 For an in-depth analysis of the insurgency in Angola between 1975 and 1992, see Christopher Paul, Colin P. Clarke, Beth Grill, and Molly Dunigan, Paths to Victory: Lessons from Modern Insurgencies, Santa Monica, Calif.: RAND Corporation, RR-291/1-OSD, 2013.

3 Michael L. Ross, “What Do We Know About Natural Resources and Civil War,” Journal of Peace Research, Vol. 41, No. 3, May 2004.

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Mexico Is Not Colombia: Alternative Historical Analogies for Responding to the Challenge of Violent Drug-Trafficking Organizations - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Figure and Tables xiii
  • Summary xv
  • Acknowledgments xxix
  • Abbreviations xxxi
  • Chapter One - Colombia (1994–2010) 1
  • Chapter Two - Peru (1980–1992) 23
  • Chapter Three - The Balkans (1991–2010) 53
  • Chapter Four - West Africa (1990–2010) 85
  • Chapter Five - The Caucasus (1990–2012) 119
  • Chapter Six - Somalia (1991–2010) 151
  • Chapter Seven - Angola (1992–2010) 167
  • Chapter Eight - Burma (1988–2012) 183
  • Chapter Nine - Tajikistan (1992–2008) 197
  • Chapter Ten - Afghanistan (2001–2013) 211
  • References 223
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