Gender and Jewish Difference from Paul to Shakespeare

By Lisa Lampert | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1

1. Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex, trans. H. M. Parshley (New York: Vintage, 1974), 301.

2. Cited in Karl Morrison, Understanding Conversion (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1992), 62.

3. In the introduction to The Second Sex, Beauvoir also several times alludes to the situation of the Jews, pointing out the ways in which the Jews and Blacks, like women, occupy the place of the particular in relation to a normative universal that is not only masculine but Christian and white.

4. As Valerie Smith notes in the introduction to Not Just Race, Not Just Gender: Black Feminist Readings (New York: Routledge, 1998), the assumption that gender and race are “mutually dependent, interlocking cultural constructions and projections” is not a recent development, but can be found, for example, in the nineteenth-century work of thinkers and activists such as Sojourner Truth and Harriet Jacobs (xiii).

5. The literature here is extensive. Among the works that have been important to my thinking are Gloria Anzaldüa and Cherríe Moraga, This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color (Watertown, Mass.: Persephone Press, 1981); bell hooks, Feminist Theory from Margin to Center (Boston: South End Press, 1984); Chela Sandoval, “U.S. Third World Feminism: The Theory and Method of Oppositional Consciousness in the Postmodern World,” Genders 10 (1991): 1–24; Trinh T. Minh-ha, Woman, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1989); Barbara Smith, “Toward a Black Feminist Criticism,” Conditions: Two, no. 2 (October 1977), reprinted in All the Women Are White, and All the Blacks Are Men, But Some of Us Are Brave: Black Women’s Studies, ed. Gloria T. Hull, Patricia Bell Scott, and Barbara Smith (Old Westbury, N.Y.: Feminist Press, 1982), 157–75. See also Marianne Hirsch and Evelyn Fox Keller, Conflicts in Feminism (New York: Routledge, 1990).

6. Recognition of intersectionality is not limited to these theoretical schools. Hans Mayer, Aussenseiter (Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkampf, 1981), has had an important impact among German academics and intellectuals, for example.

7. Anne McClintock, Imperial Leather: Race, Gender and Sexuality in the Colonial Contest (New York: Routledge, 1995), 5.

8. Kimberlé Crenshaw, “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women of Color,” in Critical Race Theory: The Key

-175-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gender and Jewish Difference from Paul to Shakespeare
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • 1 - Introduction- Made, Not Born 1
  • 2 - The Hermeneutics of Difference 21
  • 3 - Reprioritizing the Prioress’s Tale 58
  • 4 - Creating the Christian in Late Medieval East Anglian Drama 101
  • 5 - "O What a Goodly outside Falsehood Hath!" Exegesis and Identity in the Merchant of Venice 138
  • Conclusion 168
  • Abbreviations 173
  • Notes 175
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 265
  • Acknowledgments 275
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 277

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.