The Phenomenon of Torture: Readings and Commentary

By William F. Schulz | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. Adam Hochschild, King Leopold’s Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa (New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1998), 120-23.

2. Geoffrey Robertson, Crimes Against Humanity: The Struggle for Global Justice (New York: New Press, 2000), 390-91.

3. Archdiocese of São Paulo, Torture in Brazil: A Report by the Archdiocese of Sao Paulo, trans Jaime Wright, ed. Joan Dassin (New York: Vintage, 1986), 16-17.

4. William F. Schulz, Tainted Legacy: 9/11 and the Ruin of Human Rights (New York: Thunder’s Mouth Press/Nation Books, 2003), 155.

5. Jean Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness (New York: Washington Square Press, 1966).

6. And the stories can be hard to read. Far more than one Amnesty International supporter has told me that, when they receive a direct mail appeal for funds from us in their mailbox, they can’t stand to read the letter, though we try hard to avoid anything too gruesome. Then, too, it is easy to become numb to atrocity.

7. David Buss, ‘The Evolution of Evil,” http://www.edge.org (accessed January 8, 2006).

8. Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, “America’s Place in the World,” November 17, 2005:15 percent say it is “often” justified, 31 percent “sometimes,” and 17 percent “rarely.”

9. Executive Order Outlining Treatment of al-Qaida and Taliban Detainees, February 7, 2002.

10. Meet the Press, September 16, 2001.

11. Memo from Jay Bybee, Office of Legal Counsel in the Justice Department, to Alberto Gonzalez, White House legal counsel, August 1, 2002.

12. Moreover, the U.S. has invoked certain “reservations” to its own ratification of CAT, including restricting the definition of crimes under the Convention to those which would be considered crimes under the U.S. Constitution.

13. And, indeed, in a landmark case referenced in John Conroy’s book Unspeakable Acts, Ordinary People (Chapter V, Reading 6) the European Court of Human Rights ruled that, while five punishments inflicted on IRA prisoners by British forces in 1971 “did not constitute a practice of torture within the meaning of Article 3” of the European Convention on Human Rights, they did constitute a

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The Phenomenon of Torture: Readings and Commentary
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter I - Torture in Western History 11
  • Chapter II - Being Tortured 47
  • Chapter III - Who Are the Torturers? 99
  • Chapter IV - The Dynamics of Torture 153
  • Chapter V - The Social Context of Torture 193
  • Chapter VI - The Ethics of Torture 219
  • Chapter VII - Healing the Victims, Stopping the Torture 283
  • Appendix- Excerpts from Documents 357
  • How to Get Involved 365
  • Notes 367
  • Bibliography 377
  • Acknowledgments 381
  • Credits and Permissions 383
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