The Phenomenon of Torture: Readings and Commentary

By William F. Schulz | Go to book overview

Credits and Permissions

Chapter I

Reading 1. Page DuBois, Torture and Truth (London: Routledge, 1991). Reproduced by permission of Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Reading 2. William D. Edwards, Wesley J. Gabel, and Floyd E. Hosmer, “On the Physical Death of Jesus Christ,” Journal of the American Medical Association 255, 1455 (March 1986). Reproduced by permission of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. All rights reserved. The authors of this selection and Mayo Clinic do not necessarily endorse the positions/opinions of the anthology, its editor, or Amnesty International. New English Bible © 1961,1970 Oxford University Press and Cambridge University Press.

Reading 3. John H. Langbein, Torture and the Law of Proof: Europe and England in the Ancien Regime. Copyright © 1977 University of Chicago. Reprinted by permission of University of Chicago Press. All rights reserved.

Reading 4. Edward Peters, Torture, expanded edition (1985; Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1996), 41-73. Reproduced by permission of the University of Pennsylvania Press.

Reading 5. Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, trans. Alan Sheridan (New York: Pantheon, 1977); English translation copyright © 1977 Alan Sheridan. Originally published in French as Surveiller et punir: naissance de la prison (Paris: Editions Gallimard, 1975; London: Allen Lane, 1975); copyright © 1975 Editions Gallimard. Reprinted by permission of George Borchardt, Inc., for Éditions Gallimard.

Reading 6. Cesare Beccaria, “An Essay on Crimes and Punishments,” in Isaac Kramnick, ed., The Portable Enlightenment Reader (London: Penguin, 1995).

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The Phenomenon of Torture: Readings and Commentary
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter I - Torture in Western History 11
  • Chapter II - Being Tortured 47
  • Chapter III - Who Are the Torturers? 99
  • Chapter IV - The Dynamics of Torture 153
  • Chapter V - The Social Context of Torture 193
  • Chapter VI - The Ethics of Torture 219
  • Chapter VII - Healing the Victims, Stopping the Torture 283
  • Appendix- Excerpts from Documents 357
  • How to Get Involved 365
  • Notes 367
  • Bibliography 377
  • Acknowledgments 381
  • Credits and Permissions 383
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