On the Importance of Being an Individual in Renaissance Italy: Men, Their Professions, and Their Beards

By Douglas Biow | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

In the process of examining the notion of the individual in Renaissance Italy, this book reflects on a variety of other topics that I have been thinking about for some time now: the marvelous, wonder, professionalism, work, humanism, cleanliness, propriety, personalities, and masculinities. As a result it owes a great deal to many people—too many to recognize adequately in two acknowledgments paragraphs—since it effectively retraces passages of my own career as I became interested in those topics over time, beginning in one or two instances as far back as graduate school, which strikes me as a very long time ago, especially as I advance all the more grudgingly into middle age but serenely enough, I suppose, into grandfatherhood (Hi, Annabelle!). But in writing this book, which has taken me roughly a dozen years off and on to put together into final form, I am especially grateful to Alison Frazier, Tom Pangle, Wayne A. Rebhorn, Andrew Riggsby, and Louis Waldman, whose comments have sometimes found themselves incorporated directly into my text, although, to be sure, all errors contained within it should always be considered my own. I also owe a great debt to Stefano U. Baldassarri, Evan Carton, John Clarke, Janet Cox-Rearick, Bill Eamon, Michael Gagarin, Brian Levack, and Jorie Woods, who at different stages in the writing of this book helped me refine my argument in crucial places. My thanks as well to the following people for their help and support along the way: Katie Arens, Kit Belgum, Daniela Bini, Carl Blyth, Erwin Cook, Sally Dickson, Andrew dell’Antonio, Ingrid Edlund-Berry, Ann Johns, Julia Hairston, Charlotte Harris, Neil Kamil, David Lines, Roberto Muratore, Wendy Nesmith, Martha Newman, Antonella Olson, Guy Raffa, Massimo Scalabrini, Deanna Shemek, Lin Shivers, Nancy Struever, Eva Struhal, Paul Sullivan, Katherine Swaller, and Paul Woodruff. I’d also feel remiss if I didn’t express my gratitude belatedly toward a remarkable person who long ago drew me into literature and literary studies: the late poet, dramatist, journal writer, printer, and polyglot Claude Fredericks, whose unusual and voluminous writings are only now beginning to appear in print and have recently been acquired, at least in part, by the Getty Research Institute. Lastly, I owe a great deal to the recently

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