Top Down: The Ford Foundation, Black Power, and the Reinvention of Racial Liberalism

By Karen Ferguson | Go to book overview

Index
Page numbers in italics refer to illustrations.
Abrams, Frank, 42
Acheson, Dean, 41, 71
Affective education, 14, 110, 162, 273n26; Ford Foundation promotion of, 14, 166; Mario Fantini and, 110, 162, 166, 171
Affirmative action, 267–68
African-American Teachers Association, 117
Aid to Families with Dependent Children, 217
Allen, Robert L., 11, 79
Alley Theatre (Houston), 173, 191, 206
Alliance for Progress, 64, 237
American Dilemma, An (Myrdal), 40–41, 42, 70
American Negro Theatre, 176
American Place Theatre, 194, 199, 207
Anti-Communism, 47–48, 66, 79. See also Cold War
Appalachian whites, 58–59
Ashmore, Harry S., 43, 44, 55
Assimilation (as Ford Foundation goal), 1, 7, 8–9, 18, 24, 35, 40, 68, 87, 125, 210; abandonment of, 14, 263; black activists’ challenge to, 126, 132; and black power, 5, 7, 10, 12; and black theater, 170, 171, 176, 184, 209; and CDC model, 211, 212, 215, 218, 219, 234, 242, 246; and developmental separatism, 64, 77–78, 81–82, 89, 209, 211, 234, 242; and education, 101, 105, 108, 110, 111–12, 123, 160; and example of white ethnics, 74, 75, 111–12; and individual upward mobility, 83, 247; international, 79; and modernization theory, 4, 8–9, 36, 39; and nonblack minorities, 158–59; Paul Ylvisaker and, 52–55, 57–64, 75, 263 Astor, Nancy, 248
Bailey, Peter, 178
Bakke case, 267–68
Baldwin, James, 147, 177
Baraka, Amiri, 147, 177, 192, 197, 199, 201
Barnes, Clive, 183, 188
Bassett, Angela, 181
Beame, Abraham, 263
Bedford-Stuyvesant Development and
Services Corporation (D&S), 17, 222–24, 249, 250; composition of, 223–24, 248, 249; power given to, 222–23, 229, 231, 232; Franklin Thomas and, 229, 230, 231–32, 234
Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood, 220–21. See also Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation
Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation (BSRC), 17, 210, 229–35, 247–54, 255, 258; federal funding for, 215, 230, 231, 243, 247, 252; as flagship for CDCs, 210, 231, 235, 240, 243–44, 252, 253–54; formation of, 222–29; and gender conflict, 225–26; neighborhood served by, 220–21; subordinate role of, 229, 231–32; Franklin Thomas and, 17, 210, 225, 227–35, 247, 248, 252
Behavioral Research Laboratories, 162
Behavioral science, 38, 109–10, 125; Ford Foundation funding for, 38, 109
Bell, David E., 77
Bell, Derrick A., Jr., 265–66
Benjamin, Donald, 225, 227
Bentley, Eric, 207
Bethel, Mark, 250, 253

-313-

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