17,000 Classroom Visits Can't Be Wrong: Strategies That Engage Students, Promote Active Learning, and Boost Achievement

By John V. Antonetti; James R. Garver | Go to book overview

6
Engagement

Overall Engagement Level
Engaged6%
On-task91%
Off-task3%

Look 2 Learning sample size: 17,124 classroom visits

When educators first see these numbers, they are almost universally horrified— and often a bit defensive. One reason is that, as teachers and former teachers, we have a tendency to put percentages on a school grading scale, which doesn’t recognize that a 90-80-70-60 standard of success might not fit every data set. For instance, the best batters in professional baseball might have a batting average of around. 350. That means they only hit the ball 350 times in 1,000 times at bat. That equates to 35 percent—a low F—on a traditional grading scale. Nevertheless, that’s still enough to make the player famous and earn him millions of dollars per year.

Another disconnect might be that we are operating with different definitions of the word engaged. How has our thinking about engagement evolved?

Up until about a decade ago, the word engagement was used in a binary way to describe student behavior—students either were working or they were not (although using the word engaged might have implied that students were following directions with enthusiasm). Then, in 2002, Phillip Schlechty published

-78-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
17,000 Classroom Visits Can't Be Wrong: Strategies That Engage Students, Promote Active Learning, and Boost Achievement
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • 1- Focus on Learning 3
  • 2- How to Use This Book 16
  • 3- Thinking and the Brain 24
  • 4- Learning Targets 44
  • 5- Know Your Learners 62
  • 6- Engagement 78
  • 7- Instructional Strategies 97
  • 8- Differentiation 116
  • 9- Learning Pathways 127
  • 10- Closure 141
  • 11- Reflection 150
  • 12- Putting It All Together 162
  • 13- Final Thoughts 178
  • References 180
  • Index 182
  • About the Authors 187
  • Related Ascd Resources 189
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 190

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.