17,000 Classroom Visits Can't Be Wrong: Strategies That Engage Students, Promote Active Learning, and Boost Achievement

By John V. Antonetti; James R. Garver | Go to book overview

13
Final Thoughts

John:Well, it looks like we’ve come to the end of the book.
Jim:And, in the writing, what a long but enjoyable journey it’s been. A little strange sometimes, but definitely enjoyable.
John:I’m glad you used the word journey. In many ways, this book describes our journey and the evolution of our thoughts over the past decade while visiting these various and varied classrooms.
Jim:I sometimes worry that when people see the data from our walks, they will be discouraged or even angry.
John:I worry about that, too. But I hope they understand that we are merely recording what we see. The perspective changes dramatically when we look at the lesson through the lens of the learner.
Jim:Wow, that’s almost a tongue twister! But I like it. I also hope folks understand that we didn’t model each and every one of these things in our own classrooms when we were teaching.
John:Not consistently, anyway. We didn’t know what we do now.
Jim:But if we now have that new knowledge, as professionals, don’t we have an obligation to apply it?
John:In the medical profession, the answer would certainly be yes. And I think we see great examples of successful application in the partner schools with whom we work.
Jim:The L2L data would certainly bear that out. We see upward trends in many of those schools and districts.
John:What do you think they have in common?

-178-

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17,000 Classroom Visits Can't Be Wrong: Strategies That Engage Students, Promote Active Learning, and Boost Achievement
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • 1- Focus on Learning 3
  • 2- How to Use This Book 16
  • 3- Thinking and the Brain 24
  • 4- Learning Targets 44
  • 5- Know Your Learners 62
  • 6- Engagement 78
  • 7- Instructional Strategies 97
  • 8- Differentiation 116
  • 9- Learning Pathways 127
  • 10- Closure 141
  • 11- Reflection 150
  • 12- Putting It All Together 162
  • 13- Final Thoughts 178
  • References 180
  • Index 182
  • About the Authors 187
  • Related Ascd Resources 189
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