Becoming a Great High School: 6 Strategies and 1 Attitude That Make a Difference

By Tim R. Westerberg | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

BY ROBERT J. MARZANO

High schools are in the spotlight, and virtually all high schools, even high schools that have longstanding reputations in their communities as “good schools,” are under pressure to get better. Among the major sources of this pressure to improve—a force that few in leadership positions in a high school community can afford to ignore—are the No Child Left Behind Act, state accountability report cards, competition for students created through ever-expanding choice initiatives, and fears of losing our competitive advantage in the 21st century global economy.

While the forces of change are many, the “remedies” proposed to improve high schools are legion. What high school leaders and leadership teams wishing to significantly improve their schools need is a comprehensive and practical research-based model to guide them to those strategies and initiatives that have a proven track record of increasing student achievement. This book definitely fills that need—specifically by focusing on the 6+1 model.

Dr. Tim Westerberg, a 26-year veteran of the high school principalship and a nationally known high school reform activist, presents such a model in this book, Becoming a Great High School. Taken together, the research-based conclusions, recommendations, and examples in this work, briefly summarized here, provide a framework for helping any high school become a great high school.

High schools that get uncommon results from common student populations have several things in common, not the least of which is an effortbased, we-expect-success school culture. Examples from high-performing

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Becoming a Great High School: 6 Strategies and 1 Attitude That Make a Difference
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 129

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.